Protopic Makes Me Itch

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Scrotum itches and is red, help!!?
    For the past few weeks my scrotum has been very itchy and become red. The skin on the scrotum is now scaly. I have atopic dermatitis (eczema) on my arms, legs, and neck so could it have possibly spread to my scrotum? I have Protopic and other creams for my eczema on the other parts of my body. They work well there but the symptoms seem to come back soon after I apply the cream.
    I've tried applying Vaseline and Aveeno moisturizer, they help for the moment but after a few hours the itch returns. If I sleep with Vaseline all over my scrotum (and not on one specific spot) I will be so irritated that I won't fall asleep until hours later. I'm not sure if I can apply Protopic on my scrotum so I haven't tried that yet...
    I'm embarrassed to see my doctor about this issue :/

    Please help me!!

    • ANSWER:
      Stop with the Vaseline! That will only make matters worse. It sounds like plain old jock itch. Ask your doctor for a prescription cream - the over the counter stuff sucks. If you are overweight or diabetic, excessive intake of sugar or high blood sugar can make you more prone to getting jock itch. Sleep without wearing underwear and whenever you can go without any underwear and let that area air out as much as you can.

      Get over your embarrassment with your doctor. He/She is there to help. Although, I understand the embarrassment. It's just something you need to get over. You are the one suffering for your embarrassment, not the doctor.

      For temporary relief of the symptoms, use some sun burn gel on the area - something with lidocaine in it is best. NO VASELINE!

  2. QUESTION:
    lip bumps,redness,pain no itch?
    i was searching for an answer about an unexplained lip bumps redness and pain,
    i found that user here on yahoo answers have described the exact same thing "my condition"
    how can i contact this user?
    user's name : saracmd

    anyway ,Something is wrong with my lips. This has happened to me many times before and still happening

    First: this is not a coldsore/fever blister. It is ALL OVER my lips, not in one spot.
    ( I did a lip biopsy it was good nothings wrong with my immune system)

    My lips are red and swollen. They feel raw, and are bumpy like sand paper. When i look very closely at them,
    they have tiny light bumps all over them. almost like sand beneath the first layer of skin. When licked, they taste strange, almost like blood.
    A few days into this problem, they begin to puss. It is very painful, My family doctor and many many more doctors could not explain what this was,
    and a doctor at outpatients said it was just chapped lips. several times that this happened before I was under stress, so I thought it was a fever blister.
    I treated it as such, and it did not go away.
    It is an on and off condition
    My dermatologist said it's food allergy they put me on "protopic it's an cortisone based cream" after using it like 2 months my lips started thinning
    and became super sensitive so I stopped it ,I tried so many products lipbalms ,creams..nowadays I'm using Vaseline but it's not helping ,I'm still using it
    just Cz I can't put nothing! It feels so wired!

    Has this happened to anyone before?
    Does anyone have an ideas as to what this could be?
    Has anyone ever had an allergic reaction like this before?

    • ANSWER:
      Hey,
      Yes, this has happened to me before.
      It was called "contact dermatitis" for me.
      I went through 2-3 doctors to find an answer, and 2 of them were wrong. The last one finally diagnosed me correctly as an allergic reaction. They were all GP's, not dermatologists (this was my mistake).

      Your dermatologist should be correct by giving you a cortisone cream, but like the other answer, it can make it worse. These are the following answers I got from doctors and from my own research:

      1. Contact dermatitis
      Lips feel raw, like sandpaper when you rub them together, tiny tiny bumps on lips, especially across your vermillion border, peeling, scaling, redness, sometimes blisters.

      Cause: I got mine from an expired chapstick. (Yikes). It scared the hell out of me because it's never happened before... thought it was countless of other things lol. Got a blood test, I am completely clean for all viruses. Both doctors were clueless after that. Last doc told me it was dermatitis, or could be bacterial infection. He said you can get it from food, from lip products, any cosmetics, any facial wash (basically anything you put onto your facial skin that causes an allergic reaction. It's quite common.)
      Remedy: I drank a lot of water, specifically honey water with lemon. It's naturally anti-bacterial and great for your immune system. Keep your lips dry. Never, ever lick them.
      **** Throw out every single lip product you own. Lipsticks, makeup brushes, lip gloss, chapsticks, etc. ****
      The bacteria could have spread each time they touched your lips. Keep the lip area clean. Buy a brand new lip balm: I recommend Dr. Bronner's Organic lip balm. This is the only lip balm I will ever use on my lips now.
      Stay out of the sun. I didn't do this back then, but if it ever happens again, I will do this... Buy some tea tree oil. Dilute it with some safe carrier oil, such as olive, jojoba or apricot (I recommend jojoba). Both are available at Trader Joe's or health food store. Mix them and apply it to your lips. I actually recommend this more than the neosporin. Applying too much neosporin can cause another allergic reaction. Keep your immune system strong by eating lots of fruit and vegetables.

      2. Fungal infection
      Remedy: I think you'll need something from your dermatologist

      3. Bacterial infection
      Remedy: The info above will apply to this

      4. Viral infection
      Remedy: Maybe you should get some blood work done if you haven't already... but I'm pretty sure you got a bacterial infection.

      Hope it helps! Don't stress too much about it. It's not worth it (really), I put myself through so much stress when all I needed was time and right remedies. I feel for you, but I promise it's not permanent. Hang in there!!

  3. QUESTION:
    My baby is 3 1/2 months old and suffers from eczema. What can I do to stop the itch and clear up the rash?
    I have taken her to the dematoligist and all they keep telling me to do is to use creams and let it run its course. I have tried Aveeno, Eucerin, aquafor and i have used the cortisone cream for the itch. None of it works and she constantly tries to scratch. She used whatever she can get her hands on to scratch with from her blanket to her closed fist. Does anyone have any recommendations and please dont say that her doctor knows whats best for her. What is best for one is not best for all.

    • ANSWER:
      The goal of treatment is to relieve and prevent itching, which can lead to infection. Since the disease makes skin dry and itchy, lotions and creams are recommended to keep the skin moist. These solutions are usually applied when the skin is damp, such as after bathing, to help the skin retain moisture. Cold compresses may also be used to relieve itching.

      Over-the-counter or prescription creams and ointments containing corticosteroids, such as hydrocortisone, are often prescribed to reduce inflammation. For severe cases, your doctor may prescribe oral corticosteroids. In addition, if the affected area becomes infected, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to kill the infection-causing bacteria.

      Other treatments include antihistamines to reduce severe itching, tar treatments (chemicals designed to reduce itching), phototherapy (therapy using ultraviolet light applied to the skin) and the drug cyclosporine for people whose condition doesn't respond to other treatments.

      The FDA has approved two drugs known as topical immunomodulators (TIMs) for the treatment of moderate-to-severe eczema. The drugs, Elidel and Protopic, are skin creams that work by altering the immune system response to prevent flare-ups.

      On March 10, 2005, the FDA warned doctors to prescribe Elidel and Protopic with caution due to concerns over a possible cancer risk associated with their use.

      As of January 2006, these two creams carry the FDA's strongest "black box" warning on their packaging to alert doctors and patients to these potential risks. The warning advises doctors to prescribe short-term use of Elidel and Protopic only after other available eczema treatments have failed in adults and children over the age of 2.

      Eczema outbreaks can usually be avoided or the severity lessened by following these simple tips.

      * Moisturize frequently
      * Avoid sudden changes in temperature or humidity
      * Avoid sweating or overheating
      * Reduce stress
      * Avoid scratchy materials, such as wool
      * Avoid harsh soaps, detergents and solvents
      * Avoid environmental factors that trigger allergies (for example, pollen, mold, dust mites, and animal dander)
      * Be aware of any foods that may cause an outbreak and avoid those foods

      Hope this helps!!!!! I fell REALLY bad for your baby!!!!!!:(

  4. QUESTION:
    what are some good waysto stop an itching addiction?
    i have ezema i scratch till i bleed (not to be gorey or anything)

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have Dry eczema or Wet eczema??? My daughter has both... with Dry eczema you definitly want to moisturize your skin...but if it Wet eczema...Putting lotions on it make it worse...

      For her dry Eczema;;
      The thing that worked best for her is Cetaphil lotion and they have a mild skin cleanser I use that instead of regular soap on my daughter. Cetaphil is kind of expensive though but Walmart has a store brand that works just as good and is much more affordable... Hydocortisone works for a little bit... Just be careful about scatching too much ,,because it can get infected and that is not pretty..and it can cause scarring...( But I am sure you already knew that ) :o)

      For her Wet eczema under her eyes and behind her knees... We had to get the doctor to prescribe something.. We used Ellidel on her Wet eczema and Cetaphil on her dry eczema unless it was really bad(WINTER) then we used Ellidel on that too.

      See your Doctor and they can prescribe you a cream for it... Ellidel works well...and there is protopic too... (both need to be perscribed) THE ONLY THING IS.... Follow your Doctor's directions for this medication... There is a small risk of some pretty serious problems if you use it too much....(SO DON"T LATHER IT ON>>>) .. but my doctor told me just to put a very small amount on 4 times a day for 3 days and it clears up... Now occasionally it does come back.... but then we do the 3 day treatment again and it goes way for a few months... As of now she has not had any problems with it in almost a year.... AND SHE HAD IT REALLY BAD>>> even under her eyes,..

      I know you must be miserable.. Hope this helps...

  5. QUESTION:
    My 3 yr old has exzema. How do I get her to stop itching?
    Any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      I am an atopic dermatitis/eczema patient of 40+ years. The first thing you should do is take your child to a dermatologist if you haven't done so already.The doctor will prescribe a cortisone cream or ointment for your child.Children should be under a doctor's care when they are first diagnosed with eczema because of possible side-effects that can occur when your child scratches her skin while on the cortisone(she can get a bad infection because cortisone thins the skin). Stay away form Protopic and Elidel until further research shows thath these two medicines do not raise one's risk for skin cancer.Non-medical things you can do are: Cut her nails and keep them short so she'll do less damage when she scratches.Aveeno Bath Powder contains colloidial oatmeal which is good for temporarily relieving the itch. They also make a good bathoil that provides the skin with a protective barrier. Never use soap.Use Cetaphil Bar cleanser,lotion cleanser and lotions.These will not irritate the skin.Donot use anything that contains lanocaine or benzocaine. Stay away from lanolin.Stay away from highly scented detergents and fabric softeners and make sure her clothes are soft and silky.Dermatologists prefer that eczema patients wear cotton and stay away from polyester which traps
      perspiration near the skin. When wearing woolen clothes,there must be a bariier between the skin and the wool..even between cashmere which is considered soft,so look for silky underpinnings/liners like camisoles amd long pant-liners.
      The itch can only be temporarily stopped.Your daughter will try to scratch because she is so young and it's hard for a little one not to scratch sometimes.
      Go to mywebmd.com and to the site for The National Eczema Association.

  6. QUESTION:
    daughter of 2yrs has exzema please help?
    she had it since she was a few months old, and everything the doctors are giving me like steroid creams, hydrocourtazone (cant spell) are not working, any ideas of what i can use?? please help

    • ANSWER:
      I have eczema and hydrocortizone never works for me

      she is too young for a tan but take her out into the sun. Sun does wonders for my skin when my eczema is bad, I use protopic for my eczema as well.

      Make sure she doesn't take too hot of baths, because it dries the skin out. make sure she uses top of the line lotion like Eucerin (use it all the time, the more moisturized, the less she will itch) and make sure the stuff you put on her skin isn't scented.

  7. QUESTION:
    what are the advantages of the chillows?
    hi i have facial eczema, and really itch badly at night, so it never heals. i've just heard about chillows, has anyone tried them? what are the advantages of them??

    Thanks in advance!
    apparently chillows are pillows which u fill with water once, and they keep you cool throughout the night and it helps eczema. anyone ever tried anything like that?

    • ANSWER:
      Don't know what chillows is!

      Signs and symptoms of eczema may include itching, small blisters with oozing, and thickened and scaly skin.Eczema can be treated with preventive measures and medications. The goals of treatment are to ease symptoms, especially itching, and to control the rash.

      Treatments for atopic dermatitis (eczema) aim to reduce inflammation, relieve itching and prevent future flare-ups. Over-the-counter (nonprescription) anti-itch creams, along with other self-care measures, may help control mild atopic dermatitis.

      Although atopic dermatitis is related to allergies, eliminating allergens is rarely helpful in clearing the condition. Occasionally, items that trap dust ? such as feather pillows, down comforters, mattresses, carpeting and drapes ? can worsen the condition. Allergy shots usually aren't successful in treating atopic dermatitis and might even make the condition worse.

      Medications

      * Corticosteroid creams or ointments. Your doctor may recommend prescription corticosteroid creams or ointments to ease scaling and relieve itching.
      # Antibiotics. You may need antibiotics if you have a bacterial skin infection or an open sore or fissure caused by scratching. Your doctor may recommend taking antibiotics for a short time to treat an infection or for longer periods of time to reduce bacteria on your skin and to prevent recurrent infections.
      # Oral antihistamines. If itching is severe, oral antihistamines may help. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others) can make you very sleepy and may be helpful at bedtime. If your skin cracks open, your doctor may prescribe mildly astringent wet dressings to prevent infection.
      Immunomodulators. A class of medications called immunomodulators, such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel), affects the immune system and may help maintain normal skin texture and reduce flares of atopic dermatitis. This prescription-only medication is approved for children over the age of 2 and for adults.
      Infantile eczema
      Treatment for infantile eczema includes identifying and avoiding skin irritations, avoiding extreme temperatures, and using bath oils, lotions, creams or ointments to lubricate your baby's skin.

  8. QUESTION:
    bumpy rash on inner elbow?
    hi, I'm 17 and over the years I would get a rash on both my arms in the inner bending part of my elbow, it was just annoying at first but about a week ago it became very bothersome. it's a tad bumpy and like dry skin look. it's super itchy red and uncomfortable. it will not go away. I've tried creams and everything. should I see a doctor or are there any home things I can do? what is this?

    • ANSWER:
      Eczema

      Eczema describes several non-contagious conditions where skin is inflamed, red, dry, and itchy. Stress, irritants (like soaps), allergens, and climate can trigger flare-ups though they're not eczema's exact cause, which is unknown. In adults, eczema often occurs on the elbows and hands, and in "bending" areas, such as inside the elbows. Treatments include topical or oral medications and shots.

      What Are the Symptoms of Eczema?

      No matter which part of the skin is affected, eczema is almost always itchy. Sometimes the itching will start before the rash appears, but when it does, the rash most commonly appears on the face, back of the knees, wrists, hands, or feet. It may also affect other areas as well.

      Affected areas usually appear very dry, thickened, or scaly. In fair-skinned people, these areas may initially appear reddish and then turn brown. Among darker-skinned people, eczema can affect pigmentation, making the affected area lighter or darker.

      In infants, the itchy rash can produce an oozing, crusting condition that happens mainly on the face and scalp, but patches may appear anywhere.

      How Is Eczema Treated?

      The goal of treatment for eczema is to relieve and prevent itching, which can lead to infection. Since the disease makes skin dry and itchy, lotions and creams are recommended to keep the skin moist. These products are usually applied when the skin is damp, such as after bathing, to help the skin retain moisture. Cold compresses may also be used to relieve itching.

      Over-the-counter products, such as hydrocortisone 1% cream, or prescription creams and ointments containing corticosteroids, are often prescribed to lessen inflammation. In addition, if the affected area becomes infected, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to kill the infection-causing bacteria.

      Other treatments include antihistamines to lessen severe itching, tar treatments (chemicals designed to reduce itching), phototherapy (therapy using ultraviolet light applied to the skin), and the drug cyclosporine for people whose condition doesn't respond to other treatments.

      The FDA has approved two drugs known as topical immunomodulators (TIMs) for the treatment of mild-to-moderate eczema. The drugs, Elidel and Protopic, are skin creams that work by altering the immune system response to prevent flare-ups.

      The FDA has warned doctors to prescribe Elidel and Protopic with caution due to concerns over a possible cancer risk associated with their use. The two creams also carry the FDA's "black box" warning on their packaging to alert doctors and patients to these potential risks. The warning advises doctors to prescribe short-term use of Elidel and Protopic only after other available eczema treatments have failed in adults and children over the age of 2. It should not be used in kids under age 2.
      How Can Eczema Flare-ups Be Prevented?

      Eczema outbreaks can sometimes be avoided or the severity lessened by following these simple tips.

      Moisturize frequently.
      Avoid sudden changes in temperature or humidity.
      Avoid sweating or overheating.
      Reduce stress.
      Avoid scratchy materials, such as wool.
      Avoid harsh soaps, detergents, and solvents.
      Be aware of any foods that may cause an outbreak and avoid those foods.

  9. QUESTION:
    how to cure eczema?
    plz(please) help me i need information

    • ANSWER:
      I have atopic dermatitis,the clinical term for eczema:I've had it for 40+ years. Bad news:THERE IS NO CURE!!!You can only treat it,and you have to learn to live with it unless you are one of those lucky children who outgrow the condition.
      Here are things that you can do:
      1.Never ever use soap.Soap is drying and exacerbates the condition. Eczema means that you have hyper-sensitive skin;your skin is suppossed to have a protective barrier,but with eczema it's weak or non-existent.Soap,too much water,or even too much perspiration,the wrong products,all work against the skin's natural moisture,causing the itching dryness that leads to scratching and full-borne flare-ups.Instead of soap,use Cetaphil products.Cetaphil cleansers come in lotion form and in bar form.It's good to use both kinds.You can use the lotion cleanser with or without water.After cleaning up,if you have an active rash you'll apply the medication.If you don't have a rash,you apply a moisturizing lotion like Cetaphil Cream or Eucerin.The lotion has to be unscented and it can not contain lanolin,retinol,aha or sugar acids(unless your dermatologist prescribes aha products).
      The most important thing to do everyday,several times a day, is to apply the moisturizing lotion,which forms a moisturizing barrier that can serve to protect the skin against that itchy dry feeling.

      2.Over the years I have used all sorts of medications.Today,there is Cortaid cream with moisturizers,an over-the counter medication that works just as well as any prescription medication . All medicines will take time to help the skin heal.My worst flare up took 4 years to heal and I was taking prescription medications at the time and was under doctor's care.PATIENCE is the best medicine that you can use;fretting just intensifies the rash.It's a hard lesson to learn,but it's unfortunaltely the most necessary one to learn.
      Prescription medications I've used are hydrocortisone,Lidex,Prednisone(not recommended because the rash comes back when you go off of it and you are left with the side effects) and Protopic.Protopic burned and I didn't use it;this turned out to be a lucky decision because Protopic and Elidel are under investigation for causing an increased risk of skin cancer.
      If you ever get a really weepy rash,you can buy over-the-counter Bluborro Astringent powder to make wet-dressings.It will dry the ooze so your medication of choice can attack the rash.
      3. Because you have hypersensitive skin you have to be careful of the grooming products that you use. No soaps,no bubblebaths.Aveeno makes a great Colloidal Oatmeal bath powder that soothes itchy skin.They also make a great bath/shower oil,too.Shampoos that are okay to use are Neutragena T-Gel(tar-based),Denorex Tar-Based shampoo,and Nizoral Shampoo. You need to stay away from scented products,Vaseline,any cream that contains benzocaine and/or antihistamines,aha and sugar acids,retinols,petroleum jelly or greasy ointments.
      4.You need to wear cotton clothing or moisture -wicking soft fabrics,The aim is to wear soft,non-irritating fabrics that will let perspiration evaporate.Natural fabrics like cotton and tencel,and silks and linens are considered okay.If you wear wool,the wool has to be lined or you have to wear tee shirts and long underwear against your skin to keep the wool from making you itch.Clothes need to be cleaned using unscented detergents and fabric softeners.
      5.Keep your nails short and clean.Donot scratch;scratching can tear the skin and lead to an infection.
      6. Take an antihistamine;eczema,allergies and asthma are closely related.
      7.Wear cotton gloves inside rubber gloves if you have to do wet work(like washing the car).
      8.Educate yourself by reading books on skin conditions.I'll list a few in sources as well as two websites.You can always research your condition by going to the public library and looking for books on eczema and atopic dermatitis or skin diseases;just make sure that they are written by doctors!The goal is to get as much information as you can so that you are able to come up with a program that works for your skin.
      9.You will need to wear a sunblock.

  10. QUESTION:
    Skin thinning because of topical steroid use? (Eczema)?
    I have had eczema my whole life. But the past couple years it has become very severe. I have tried everything under the sun to help it get better but nothing seems to help. And now on top of all my itching my skin is super thin because of all the topical steroids. It has even caused giant stretch marks. What is going to happen if I keep applying theses creams? No to mention they put my on oral steroids all the time. What else is going to happen to my body if this keep going? What have you done to help with your eczema? I have seen dermatologist after dermatologist and they have tried everything. My insurance won't cover light therapy or protopic. I am desperate I will try anything to help. A few things that I have tried besides all the creams are bleach baths, oatmeal baths, dead sea salt soakings and tanning. Please if anyone has any suggestions let me know I am willing to do anything to get some relief from this itching.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sorry to hear of your persistent troubles with eczema, because I know how bothersome the condition can be. And that's why I'd like to provide you with the following tips to combat your stubborn skin disorder:

      As unpleasant as this phase of your treatment may be, it is also the most important. Start with an elimination diet to test for certain foodstuffs, for example tomatoes. Eat ample amounts of tomatoes for a week to ten days, and monitor your skin closely. Then discontinue eating tomatoes for a week to ten days. If your skin shows a marked improvement, tomatoes may be causing or worsening your eczema. If there is no change, move on to the next item, such as wheat. Common allergens (ingredients that cause an allergic reaction) include: shellfish, cows' milk products (cheese, ice-cream, chocolate, etc.) eggs, soy, peanuts, wheat and even sugar.

      Natural oils have anti-inflammatory properties and are particularly good for the skin. Visit your local health store and pick up supplements of borage oil, fish oil OR primrose oil. Also increase your intake of Omega-6 rich foods, like olive oil, walnuts and oily fish, such as sardines and salmon.

      Reducing stress in your life has benefits beyond treating eczema, but it's easier said than done. Give yoga or meditation a try. One session of yoga a week can make a phenomenal difference to your mental state. If you find yourself stressing out because of bad traffic, change the radio from the rock channel to classical music. Get an iPod and load it with some of your favorite low-key music. Use it while you walk for 20 minutes in the evening after work, or while you work out at the gym. If you make de-stressing a priority in your life, you'll see the difference in your skin.

      Take zinc supplements (15mg per day). It plays an important role in both skin and hair health. Many people suffer a zinc deficiency because it's hard to get sufficient zinc in your diet. You should see a marked difference in your skin's condition within 1 - 2 months.

      Shower rather than bathe. If you do bathe, make sure the water is not too hot, and make it as quick as you can.

      Wear cotton pajamas and sleep between cotton sheets. In severe cases, you can try wearing gloves / socks on your hands at night, to prevent you from scratching your skin raw.

      Go outside and expose your skin to fresh air and sunshine - for SHORT periods of time. In one study, a small amount of UV treatment helped 80% of people with skin conditions.

      I hope this works!

  11. QUESTION:
    eczema as a symptom?
    Is it possible to have eczema as a symptom for an allergy? I itch every time I get out o the shower. I use all those girly bath gels. my family switched our laundry detergent but it hasn't semed to help. I think I'm allergic to the bath gels. It's not a run of the mill itching. it's the kind that drives you MAD!

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it definitely is! I have eczema on my hands (which are extremely sensitive) from using the typical antibacterial handsoap. It is very itchy!
      In your case, the shower (hot showers actually dry your skin out, making it extremely itchy) or the bath gel(which usually contains a lot of gunk like perfumes not good for sensitve skin) may be casuing the itchiness. My dermatologist told me to only use fragrance-free products like dove(look for the sensitive skin label).
      I personally have found Aveeno to work great: you can soak in a tub of warm water with the Aveeno oatmeal(i know it sounds kind of yucky) powder for 15 min.- 30 min. Oatmeal is a natural cleanser and is really soothing. And as soon as you get out of the tub, moisturize immediately while your skin is still damp.
      There are lots of other products for sensitve skin: just look for them! If that doesn't help, I suggest seeing a dermatologist. They can prescribe an ointment for the itching like protopic.

  12. QUESTION:
    What is your effective treatment against eczema?
    Both of my children have eczema. I'm sure if you have it too, you know the whole barrage of things you try that don't work or don't work well enough. I try not to use their steriod cream unless I have to which is often. I don't want to use Protopic or Elidel b/c of the recent discussion of possibly causing cancer. I don't want to treat them for something now to trade for something far worse in the future! What do you use or do that has been the "magic trick"? Any other non steroidal creams?

    • ANSWER:
      collodial oatmeal baths nightly(oilated Aveeno)
      or use sofsyn bath oil nightly warm not hot water.. if you can't find that, ask the pharmacist for one that does not contain perfumes....you do not want doak oil, that is for psoriasis...
      pat them dry, rub them down with vaseline
      give them a antihistamine a couple times dily, stick to the directions on the bottle...., it stops them from itching and keeps their little fingers off the eczema, scratching it and getting it infected.. it will also calm them down a bit....
      get them on a diet of fresh fruit, veggies, no sugar, white cheese only, no white flour only whole wheat items like bread, pasta, tortillas, etc...., chicken, off fast food and deep fried food and there should be no excessive milk drinking, do not cook their stuff in the microwave and try not to fry their food.. bake it or bbq it....
      they should be drinking lots of water and get them out in the fresh air and doing things like walking, bike riding...
      use only baby shapoo on their hair if the scalp is involved...
      use the steroid creams on the areas that are really bad.
      they should be wwearing cotton as much as possible, this is important especially for their socks, as synthetics make them sweat and make it worse....
      if an are is really bad, make a compress with some aveeno powder and warm water and hold it on the spot for 5 min a couple times a day.
      get rid of the normal soaps in your house and use only oilated soap......
      if they go swimming, make sure it is not a chlorinated pool, this will cause them problems, if they get wet in a sprinkler, make sure they remove their wet clothes and dry off well, never rub the skin hard, pat it dry.....
      there are lots of little things that you can do to help them...

  13. QUESTION:
    what is the best treatment for my 10 months old son's eczema??

    • ANSWER:
      Medications

      Medicated ointments or creams are often used for reducing and controlling eczema. These include Elidel and Protopic. They are used twice a day and can be used on all body surfaces including the face.

      Steroid creams

      Steroid creams were once the main treatment of the itch of eczema. They are presently used less frequently but do still have a place in managing eczema flare-ups.

      Hydrating the skin

      Hydration of the skin followed by lubricating cream is the main way to prevent flare-ups of eczema. Your child should have one bath a day for 10 minutes. Water-soaked skin is far less itchy. Eczema is very sensitive to soaps, especially bubble bath. Young children can usually be cleaned without any soaps. Teenagers need a soap to wash under the arms, the genital area, and the feet. They can use a nondrying soap such as Dove for these areas. Keep shampoo off eczema.

      Lubricating cream

      Apply a lubricating cream once daily (twice a day during the winter) every day. Some lubricating creams are Eucerin, Nutragena, Aquaphor, Aveeno, Keri, Lubriderm, Nivea, and Nutraderm. Children with eczema always have dry skin. After a 10-minute bath, the skin is hydrated and feels good. Help trap the moisture in the skin by applying an outer layer of lubricating cream to the entire skin surface while it is damp (within 3 minutes of leaving the bath). Apply it after you have put steroid cream on any itchy areas. Avoid applying ointments, petroleum jelly, or vegetable shortening because they can block the sweat glands, increase the itching, and worsen the rash (especially in warm weather). Also, soap is needed to wash them off. For severe eczema, ointments may be needed temporarily to heal the skin.

      Itching

      At the first sign of any itching, apply the steroid cream to the area that itches. Keep your child?s fingernails cut short. Also, wash your child?s hands with water frequently to avoid infecting the eczema.

      Antihistamine Medicine

      An antihistamine is occasionally used to relieve itching.

      Antibiotics

      Scratching the dry, broken, and compromised skin of eczema may at times allow secondary bacterial infections to develop. Antibiotics are often used to resolve these infections.

      What can be done to prevent eczema?

      Wool fibers and clothes made of other scratchy, rough materials make eczema worse. Cotton clothes should be worn as much as possible. Avoid triggers that cause eczema to flare up, such as excessive heat, sweating, excessive cold, dry air (use a humidifier), chlorine, harsh chemicals, and soaps. Never use bubble bath. Also, keep your child off the grass during grass pollen season (May and June). Keep your child away from anyone with fever blisters since the herpesvirus can cause a serious skin infection in children with eczema.

      Try to breast-feed all high-risk infants. Otherwise, use a soy formula. Also try to avoid cow?s milk products, soy, eggs, peanut butter, wheat, and fish during your infants first year.

  14. QUESTION:
    Eczema around the eyes?
    I have eczema and its not really that bad but i get it on my eyelids and on the outside part of my eye, and the outside corner. Its not that big of a deal but its very irritating and id like to know if anyone knows any cures for it. I have protopic but i dont like using it because it makes my skin look greasy.

    • ANSWER:
      Ive got Eczema too but not on my eyes but u can go to the doctors and get a prescipted lotion that that doctors give to u it really works i used to twice a day after showering so in the morning and before bed in your situation wash your face but if not then another lotion that works is ucerin the one with no scent or anything that worked for me as well use it twice a day maybe more not only will it help the itching but will clear it up:)

      Ive had Eczema since the age 5 im 15 now and u cant even tell i have Eczema its not visible at all :)

  15. QUESTION:
    what causes eczema? is it infectious?
    what is the medication?

    • ANSWER:
      ECZEMA-

      Atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema, is an itchy eruption of the skin. It's a long-lasting (chronic) condition that may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever. Atopic dermatitis is most often seen in infants and children, but it can continue into adulthood or first appear later in life.

      Although atopic dermatitis may affect virtually any area, it classically involves skin on the arms and behind the knees. It tends to flare periodically and then subside for a time, even up to several years. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but it may result from a malfunction in the body's immune system.

      Even mild atopic dermatitis can be extremely itchy. Self-care measures, such as avoiding soaps or other irritants and applying creams or ointments, can help. See your doctor if your symptoms distract you from your daily routines or prevent you from sleeping.
      The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but is likely due to a combination of dry, irritated skin together with a malfunction in the body's immune system. Stress and other emotional disorders can worsen atopic dermatitis, but they don't cause it.

      Atopic dermatitis often occurs along with allergies and frequently runs in families in which other family members have asthma or hay fever. About three out of four children who have signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis later develop asthma or hay fever.

      Treatments for atopic dermatitis aim to reduce inflammation, relieve itching and prevent future flare-ups. Over-the-counter (nonprescription) anti-itch creams, along with other self-care measures, may help control mild atopic dermatitis.

      Although atopic dermatitis is related to allergies, eliminating allergens is rarely helpful in treating the condition. Occasionally, items that trap dust ? such as feather pillows, down comforters, mattresses, carpeting and drapes ? can worsen the condition. Allergy shots usually aren't successful in treating atopic dermatitis and might even make the condition worse.

      Medications
      Your doctor may recommend prescription corticosteroid creams or ointments to ease scaling and relieve itch. Some low-potency corticosteroid creams are available without a prescription, but you should always talk to your doctor before using any topical corticosteroid. Side effects of long-term or repeated use can include skin irritation or discoloration, thinning of the skin, infections, and stretch marks on the skin.

      If itching is severe, oral antihistamines may help. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others) can make you very sleepy and may be helpful at bedtime. If your skin cracks open, your doctor may prescribe mildly astringent wet dressings to prevent infection.

      If these measures don't help, your doctor may prescribe a short-course of oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, to reduce inflammation and to control symptoms. These medications are effective but can't be used long term because of potential serious side effects, which include cataracts, loss of bone mineral (osteoporosis), muscle weakness, decreased resistance to infection, high blood pressure and thinning of the skin.

      A class of medications called immunomodulators, such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel), affects the immune system and may help maintain normal skin texture and reduce flares of atopic dermatitis. This prescription-only medication is approved for children over the age of 2 and for adults. Due to possible concerns about the effect of these medications on the immune system when used for prolonged periods of time, the Food and Drug Administration recommends that Elidel and Protopic be used only when other treatments have failed, or if someone can't tolerate other treatments.-

  16. QUESTION:
    eczema...?? help.?
    well i have had eczema for a long time..and it still wont go away. the doctor gave me a cream..and it doesnt work..my skin really hurts and it is all cracked and red.
    any advice on what else i could do?

    • ANSWER:
      Atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema, is an itchy eruption of the skin. It's a long-lasting (chronic) condition that may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever. Atopic dermatitis is most often seen in infants and children, but it can continue into adulthood or first appear later in life.

      Treatments for atopic dermatitis aim to reduce inflammation, relieve itching and prevent future flare-ups. Over-the-counter (nonprescription) anti-itch creams, along with other self-care measures, may help control mild atopic dermatitis.

      Although atopic dermatitis is related to allergies, eliminating allergens is rarely helpful in treating the condition. Occasionally, items that trap dust ? such as feather pillows, down comforters, mattresses, carpeting and drapes ? can worsen the condition. Allergy shots usually aren't successful in treating atopic dermatitis and might even make the condition worse.

      Medications
      Your doctor may recommend prescription corticosteroid creams or ointments to ease scaling and relieve itch. Some low-potency corticosteroid creams are available without a prescription, but you should always talk to your doctor before using any topical corticosteroid. Side effects of long-term or repeated use can include skin irritation or discoloration, thinning of the skin, infections, and stretch marks on the skin.

      If itching is severe, oral antihistamines may help. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others) can make you very sleepy and may be helpful at bedtime. If your skin cracks open, your doctor may prescribe mildly astringent wet dressings to prevent infection.

      If these measures don't help, your doctor may prescribe a short-course of oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, to reduce inflammation and to control symptoms. These medications are effective but can't be used long term because of potential serious side effects, which include cataracts, loss of bone mineral (osteoporosis), muscle weakness, decreased resistance to infection, high blood pressure and thinning of the skin.

      A class of medications called immunomodulators, such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel), affects the immune system and may help maintain normal skin texture and reduce flares of atopic dermatitis. This prescription-only medication is approved for children over the age of 2 and for adults. Due to possible concerns about the effect of these medications on the immune system when used for prolonged periods of time, the Food and Drug Administration recommends that Elidel and Protopic be used only when other treatments have failed, or if someone can't tolerate other treatments.-

  17. QUESTION:
    How can I manage my eczema?
    Eczema is mistakenly known to some people as skin asthma.
    Right now, I'm 15 years old and turning 16 by April. I asked my mom about this if I had it since I was born and she said no but as long as I can remember, I've had this since I was around 5 maybe. My dad also has it and so do my uncles and aunties on my father side so basically it's hereditary but not contagious. I live in the Philippines and it's hot here. I haven't really consulted a professional dermatologist but what you'll be reading below is my condition.
    When I was young, my arm (where the arm bends...I don't know what that body part is called sorry) has a lot of rashes but it sort of stopped now.
    I have a lot of little red spots on my thighs and legs which appear like pimples.
    My legs appear to be like fish scales. It's scaly.
    Lotion doesn't seem to work for me so can anyone give me an advice? Give me some advice for the mean time until I consult a dermatologist. Thank you everyone in advance for your help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema, is an itchy eruption of the skin. It's a long-lasting (chronic) condition that may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever. Atopic dermatitis is most often seen in infants and children, but it can continue into adulthood or first appear later in life.

      Although atopic dermatitis may affect virtually any area, it classically involves skin on the arms and behind the knees. It tends to flare periodically and then subside for a time, even up to several years. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but it may result from a malfunction in the body's immune system.

      Treatment

      Treatments for atopic dermatitis aim to reduce inflammation, relieve itching and prevent future flare-ups. Over-the-counter (nonprescription) anti-itch creams, along with other self-care measures, may help control mild atopic dermatitis.

      Although atopic dermatitis is related to allergies, eliminating allergens is rarely helpful in treating the condition. Occasionally, items that trap dust ? such as feather pillows, down comforters, mattresses, carpeting and drapes ? can worsen the condition. Allergy shots usually aren't successful in treating atopic dermatitis and might even make the condition worse.

      Medications
      Your doctor may recommend prescription corticosteroid creams or ointments to ease scaling and relieve itch. Some low-potency corticosteroid creams are available without a prescription, but you should always talk to your doctor before using any topical corticosteroid. Side effects of long-term or repeated use can include skin irritation or discoloration, thinning of the skin, infections, and stretch marks on the skin.

      If itching is severe, oral antihistamines may help. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others) can make you very sleepy and may be helpful at bedtime. If your skin cracks open, your doctor may prescribe mildly astringent wet dressings to prevent infection.

      If these measures don't help, your doctor may prescribe a short-course of oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, to reduce inflammation and to control symptoms. These medications are effective but can't be used long term because of potential serious side effects, which include cataracts, loss of bone mineral (osteoporosis), muscle weakness, decreased resistance to infection, high blood pressure and thinning of the skin.

      A class of medications called immunomodulators, such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel), affects the immune system and may help maintain normal skin texture and reduce flares of atopic dermatitis. This prescription-only medication is approved for children over the age of 2 and for adults. Due to possible concerns about the effect of these medications on the immune system when used for prolonged periods of time, the Food and Drug Administration recommends that Elidel and Protopic be used only when other treatments have failed, or if someone can't tolerate other treatments.

      Light therapy (phototherapy)
      As the name suggests, this treatment uses natural or artificial light. The simplest and easiest form of phototherapy involves exposing your skin to controlled amounts of natural sunlight. Other forms of light therapy include the use of artificial ultraviolet A (UVA) or ultraviolet B (UVB) light either alone or in combination with medications.

      Though effective, long-term light therapy has many harmful effects, including premature skin aging and an increased risk of skin cancer. For these reasons, it's important to consult your doctor before using light exposure as treatment for atopic dermatitis. Your doctor can advise you on possible advantages and disadvantages of light exposure in your specific situation.

      Infantile eczema
      Treatment for infantile eczema includes identifying and avoiding skin irritations, avoiding extreme temperatures, and using bath oils, lotions, creams or ointments to lubricate your baby's skin.

      See your baby's doctor if these measures don't improve the rash or if the rash looks infected. Your baby may need a prescription medication to control the symptoms or to treat the infection. Your doctor may recommend an oral antihistamine to help lessen the itch and to cause drowsiness, which may be helpful for nighttime itching and discomfort.-

  18. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have Eczema for over years at a time? If this isn't Eczema, what could it be?
    Years ago, I found tiny little blisters on the bottom of my feet and all over the palms and fingers of my hands. Over time, the majority of it has gone away for good. For some reason or another, I continually get reoccurring micro-blisters on my left ring finger. Pretty much only concentrated there now. I've never known what they really were and never took a lot of time into looking into what it could actually be as it was never so bad as it were the 1st time.

    If it is in fact eczema, I can finally put the problem to rest. Which is why I'm curious as to how long it could stay in your system and only so seldom come back to bother.

    Details of the problem:
    Always comes back as tiny water blisters on my finger. (Used to be whole hands)
    Usually it seems to return only if I feel my body is overheated?
    Itches when blisters are present.
    After blisters dry under skin, itches more and peels in flakes that are like scabs AND live skin at the same time and if peeled early, leaves a popped blister wound (if that makes any sense)
    I am NOT allergic to anything I can think of.
    After years of the seldom recurrences, finger looks more "aged" than the neighboring fingers.
    Blisters also seem to affect my nail under the skin. (As the nail grows out, you can see tiny craters / dents on the nail's surface)

    **Please, I'm looking for a very knowledgeable answer with good citation of information provided**

    • ANSWER:
      Only a dermatologist after proper examination and a skin biopsy if needed can tell.
      Lots of dermatitis have the same symptoms or even other skin contagious diseases. So we can only ''guess'' here and guessing is not good or helpful.

      From my experience with dermatitis ( allergies and other skin diseases ) I think it's eczema. What triggers an eczema flair up depends on the person and his lifestyle. Usually fever, cold, flu, stress, climate, other conditions, products we use can trigger eczema. It is possible to be ''clean'' for a long period of time and get some outbreaks in specific areas on the body.
      Small blisters or dots go away easier, bigger patches need time.
      Eczema on nails is also really common. Most people with a dermatitis like this have ''infected'' nails as well. It's more difficult to treat it on nails and it gets worse if you have an eczema flair up in other parts of the body also. They start to get better as soon as the blisters/dots/marks go away.
      Eczema on nails can't be cleared up in days, takes time. This is because the nail has to grow in order to be healthy again. It does not just disappear.

      If for a reason you don't want to see a dermatologist go to a pharmacist and get yourself a cortisone or not peoper cream for eczema ( they work the same for any dermatitis - chronic auto immune ones ). I use Protopic for my proriasis. Protopic has no cortisone, it's not a steroid cream does not have as many side effects if using it for years, like I do. Protopic is for eczema not for psoriasis but it works great on me as well. Psoriasis and eczema have the same treatments/creams etc.
      If you see improvement in 3 days after applying the cream daily you'll know what it is. Other than Protopic you can use Dovobet gel. Works faster because it has cortisone.

      As for the nails I recommend to get yourself Tea tree oil mix it with a liquid hands soap and use it to clean your nails ( around the nail and cuticles also ) once a day. Don't add too much tea tree oil, only a tiny bit is enough. This will help the nails to recover and protect your nails from fungus. People with infected nails from a dermatitis like eczema can get nail fungus very easily as there's enough room underneath or over the nail.

      Other than that it could be prickly heat causes by hyperhidrosis.

      Gluck

  19. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a cure for eczema. I have tried all the doctors remedys and so far othing helps?
    I have had this for several years and seems to be made worse by stress.

    • ANSWER:
      I am a 40+years atopic dermatitis patient.There is no cure for eczema;there are only treatments.Flareups can take a very long time to clear up.I had a rash on my fingers that took four years to clear up;a rash on my back to a year to clear up.These are things that you can do to help you deal with it:

      1. Do not use soap.Use Cetaphil Cleansers.They come in bar form for the shower and bath.Lotion cleanser can be used for bath and shower,too.The lotion form can be used with or without water,very good if you have eczema on your hands because too much washing of the hands makes things worse because water robs the skin of moisture.

      2.Moisturize the skin and keep it moist.Cetaphil Cream Moisturizer is the best for this.They also have a formula just for facial skin,now. Everytime you wash your hands,use the cream and moiturize.After bath or shower,liberally use the moisturizer.You may want to put gloves and cotton socks on so your hands and feet really soak up the cream. Use a sunblock.
      You are more easily sunburned because of your skin's condition.

      3.Another good bath and shower preparation is Aveeno Oatmeal bath powder and oil.The bathpowder is especially good if your skin is feeling itchy.The oil adds another layer of moisturizer to the skin,a good base for the cream.

      4.Donot use any product that is highly scented,or contains lanolin,benzocaine or any
      "-caine" derivative.Do not use Vaseline.Greasy means itchy.

      5.If you have the oozing kind of rash use Bluborro Powder,following the directions to make a wet dressing that will dry the ooze.

      6.Medications that you can use are Cortaid.The Cortaid line has several formulations.They now make a lotion which is good for larger itchy areas.Prescription medications are hydrocortisone cream and Lidex.There is a little trouble with the newer medications Protopic and Elidel ;they may be responsible for an increased occurrence of skin cancer.I tried Protopic and it didn't work any better than the hydrocortisone,or the Cortaid.It did burn,though .You also need to take an antihistamine because eczema patients are usually very allergic people.Prednisone can also be taken,but it lasts as long s you take it.As soon as you finish the course of steroids,the rash comes back in days.

      8. Shampoos that are good are tar-based shampoos(Denorex and Neutragena) and non-prescription strength Nizoral.You may even be able to keep using your old shampoos if they don't bother you. I switch between Nizoral and my favorite moisturizing shampoos and I'm doing okay.When I had a rash on my hands,I used to wear gloves to wash my hair.

      9.Eczema even has an effect on the clothing you wear.You should go for the soft,silky fabrics,or cottons.The aim is to keep perspiration at bay,so maybe the new moisture-wicking soft fabric will work,to. When you wear wool,it has to be lined or you have to wear silky liners next to your skin(camisoles and pantsliner for females,tee-shirts and long underwear for males).Just don't wear anything itchy.The aim is not to make yourself want to scratch.

      8.Keep your nails short and clean.If you do scratch you have less of a chance of tearing your skin,which can lead to infections.

      9.Use unscented detergents and fabric softeners.

      10. The hardest thing is to be patient and calm.I had the flare up on my hands that took four years to burn out,and this was so hard.I was under doctor's care for the whole time.He said that I was doing everything right and keep it up.I had even tried prednisone for a while because I was tired of applying the cream;the rash came back after I stopped the steroid but was left with the side effects;it's a blood thinner so dentistrty and surgeries had to be carefully supervised. When I had the flare up on my back,I was very laissez-faire about it;applied the Cortaid twice a day and moisturized with the Cetaphil cream and just let it be.It took a year to completely heal,but it didn't itch as badly as other flare ups.

      Some people even say get rid of your pets;this is totally not necessary.You really need to tailor the advice given to you to suit your needs!

      Another misconception out there is that you need to change your diet! Sorry people;this is medically proven wrong.If you think you have a food allergy try cutting that food out of your diet and you'll see that nine times out of ten,it's not the food.

  20. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid a ecezma?
    my 8 mo old baby has had ecezma for about 4 months now and it wont go away. i have tried everything, i took away polyester and that seems to help but i can still see it.
    the ecezma is all over her face, it did get really infected and i had to use antibiotics, i only use aveeno lotion and shampoo, i have been using hydrocortisone everyday for 3 months this is why i am looking to elements such as polyester

    • ANSWER:
      You really can't "cure" it, but you can treat it.

      Depending on the severity of the ecezma, you may need to get a prescription or two from your doctor.

      My daughter has dealt with ecezma since she was three months old. I used Dreft Baby Detergent on her clothes until she was at least a year old as it is more gentle on the skin. I also use Dove for her *and my husband* as that doesn't dry out skin as much.

      Two over the counter lotions you can use that work well for mild cases are Eucerin, and Aquaphor. A warning that Aquaphor has a very vaseline quality to it, and is very greasy but does work. Perhaps only use that overnight. The Eucerin is just a regular lotion and should be used every day to keep kiddo nicely "lubbed" up.

      If the outbreak is particularly bad you could consult your doctor, ours prescribed Protopic, a really wonderful cream, that when used once or twice a day makes baby nice and smooth. To calm down any inflammation or itching the doctor could also prescribe a hydrocortizone cream, or recommend a good over the counter one.

      As my daughter has gotten older, she is almost four now, we just pretty much have to watch her, and if she starts to get a bit dry then we head it off at the pass. We almost always have Protopic on hand, and we try to keep her well lotioned once a day with Eucerin.

      Also when your child gets to the age where they enjoy playing in the tub, make sure to let them play FIRST, then do all the washing and get them out. That way they aren't sitting in soapy water for too long which can also dry them out.

      But speak with your childs doctor. When we first realized just how BAD my daughters ecezma was, it was after we had tried over the counter treaments for a while, which didn't really do enough, then one day she developed a really bad case behind each of her knees, which got red, raw and oozing...which then required her to have an antibiotic to avoid infection. Not saying your child will get NEAR that bad. But you want to make sure that if you need something more than over the counter you get it.

      I haven't heard that polyester has an effect on it, but it could I suppose. I just gave you what worked for us here.

      Good Luck

  21. QUESTION:
    Is this eczema or something else?
    For the past three weeks I had been suffering from really dry flaking skin localised only on my right hand and wrist (I don't write nor wear my watch on this wrist). I did think about going to the doctors to get a steroid cream to help it clear up. However about 5 days ago it started clearing up/healing on its own and thus I assumed it had come and gone. However about 3 days ago were the dry skin that had once been, turned into a type of prickly heat rash and now it won't stop itching and its driving me crazy. Before, when it looked dry and flaky, it looked bad but it didn't itch, but now its changed to this rash it won't stop itching.

    Is it eczema or something else, anyone got any suggestions to how to treat it? Thanks in advance

    By the way I tried E45 cream when my skin was at in the dry flaky stage and it aggravated it by making it sting and itch so I stopped using it straight away.

    • ANSWER:
      Introduction

      Atopic dermatitis, also referred to as eczema, is an itchy eruption of the skin. It's a long-lasting (chronic) condition that may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever. Atopic dermatitis is most often seen in infants and children, but it can continue into adulthood or first appear later in life.

      Although atopic dermatitis may affect virtually any area, it classically involves skin on the arms and behind the knees. It tends to flare periodically and then subside for a time, even up to several years. The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but it may result from a malfunction in the body's immune system.

      Even mild atopic dermatitis can be extremely itchy. Self-care measures, such as avoiding soaps or other irritants and applying creams or ointments, can help. See your doctor if your symptoms distract you from your daily routines or prevent you from sleeping.

      Treatment

      Treatments for atopic dermatitis aim to reduce inflammation, relieve itching and prevent future flare-ups. Over-the-counter (nonprescription) anti-itch creams, along with other self-care measures, may help control mild atopic dermatitis.

      Although atopic dermatitis is related to allergies, eliminating allergens is rarely helpful in treating the condition.

      Occasionally, items that trap dust ? such as feather pillows, down comforters, mattresses, carpeting and drapes ? can worsen the condition. Allergy shots usually aren't successful in treating atopic dermatitis and might even make the condition worse.

      Medications

      Your doctor may recommend prescription corticosteroid creams or ointments to ease scaling and relieve itch. Some low-potency corticosteroid creams are available without a prescription, but you should always talk to your doctor before using any topical corticosteroid. Side effects of long-
      term or repeated use can include skin irritation or discoloration, thinning of the skin, infections, and stretch marks on the skin.

      If itching is severe, oral antihistamines may help. Diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others) can make you very sleepy and may be helpful at bedtime. If your skin cracks open, your doctor may prescribe mildly astringent wet dressings to prevent infection.

      If these measures don't help, your doctor may prescribe a short-course of oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, to reduce inflammation and to control symptoms. These medications are effective but can't be used long term because of potential serious side effects, which include cataracts, loss of bone mineral (osteoporosis), muscle weakness, decreased resistance to infection, high blood pressure and thinning of the skin.

      A class of medications called immunomodulators, such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel), affects the immune system and may help maintain normal skin texture and reduce flares of atopic dermatitis. This prescription-only medication is approved for children over the age of 2 and for adults. Due to possible concerns about the effect of these medications on the immune system when used for prolonged periods of time, the Food and Drug Administration recommends that Elidel and Protopic be used only when other treatments have failed, or if someone can't tolerate other treatments.

      Light therapy (phototherapy)

      As the name suggests, this treatment uses natural or artificial light. The simplest and easiest form of phototherapy involves exposing your skin to controlled amounts of natural sunlight. Other forms of light therapy include the use of artificial ultraviolet A (UVA) or ultraviolet B (UVB) light either alone or in combination with medications.

      Though effective, long-term light therapy has many harmful effects, including premature skin aging and an increased risk of skin cancer. For these reasons, it's important to consult your doctor before using light exposure as treatment for atopic dermatitis. Your doctor can advise you on possible advantages and disadvantages of light exposure in your specific situation.

      Infantile eczema

      Treatment for infantile eczema includes identifying and avoiding skin irritations, avoiding extreme temperatures, and using bath oils, lotions, creams or ointments to lubricate your baby's skin.

      See your baby's doctor if these measures don't improve the rash or if the rash looks infected. Your baby may need a prescription medication to control the symptoms or to treat the infection. Your doctor may recommend an oral antihistamine to help lessen the itch and to cause drowsiness, which may be helpful for nighttime itching and discomfort.

      Self-care

      To help reduce itching and soothe inflamed skin, try these self-care measures:

      Try to identify and avoid triggers that worsen the inflammation. Rapid changes of temperature, sweating and stress can worsen the condition. Avoid direct contact with wool products, such as rugs, bedding and clothes, as well as harsh soaps and detergents.

      Apply an anti-itch cream or calamine lotion to the affected area. A nonprescription hydrocortisone cream, containing at least 1 percent hydrocortisone, can temporarily relieve the itch. A nonprescription oral antihistamine, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl, others), may be helpful if itching is severe.

      Avoid scratching whenever possible. Cover the itchy area if you can't keep from scratching it. Trim nails and wear gloves at night.

      Apply cool, wet compresses. Covering the affected area with bandages and dressings can help protect the skin and prevent scratching.

      Take a comfortably cool bath. Sprinkle the bath water with baking soda, uncooked oatmeal or colloidal oatmeal ? a finely ground oatmeal that is made for the bathtub (Aveeno, others).

      Choose mild soaps without dyes or perfumes. Be sure to rinse the soap completely off your body.

      Moisturize your skin. Use an oil or cream to seal in moisture while your skin is still damp from a bath or shower. Pay special attention to your legs, arms, back and the sides of your body. If your skin is already dry, consider using a lubricating cream.

      Use a humidifier. Hot, dry indoor air can parch sensitive skin and worsen itching and flaking. A portable home humidifier or one attached to your furnace adds moisture to the air inside your home. Portable humidifiers come in many varieties.
      Choose one that meets your budget and any special needs. And be sure to keep your humidifier clean to ward off bacteria and fungi.

      Wear cool, smooth-textured cotton clothing. Avoid clothing that's rough, tight, scratchy or made from wool. This will help you avoid irritation. Also, wear appropriate clothing in hot weather or during exercise to prevent excessive sweating.

      Good luck!
      DS

  22. QUESTION:
    i have really bad echzema?
    sry i dunno how to spell it

    but i have it really bad rite now all over my legs

    its drivin me crazyyyy any quick fix before i start to scratch so much that i bleed?

    • ANSWER:
      My daughter has it but not really bad. Her doctor RX medicine and he also told me to go to this site for more infomation on the condition. I know that its driving you crazy but maybe this will help. Also everything with her now is unscented (lotions, washing powders ( i have to use Dreft for babies))

      How Is It Treated?

      The goal of treatment is to relieve and prevent itching, which can lead to infection. Since the disease makes skin dry and itchy, lotions and creams are recommended to keep the skin moist. These solutions are usually applied when the skin is damp, such as after bathing, to help the skin retain moisture. Cold compresses may also be used to relieve itching.

      Over-the-counter or prescription creams and ointments containing corticosteroids, such as hydrocortisone, are often prescribed to reduce inflammation. For severe cases, your doctor may prescribe oral corticosteroids. In addition, if the affected area becomes infected, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics to kill the infection-causing bacteria.

      Other treatments include antihistamines to reduce severe itching, tar treatments (chemicals designed to reduce itching), phototherapy (therapy using ultraviolet light applied to the skin) and the drug cyclosporine for people whose condition doesn't respond to other treatments.

      The FDA recently approved two new drugs known as topical immunomodulators (TIMs) for the treatment of moderate-to-severe eczema. The drugs, Elidel and Protopic, are skin creams that work by altering the immune system response to prevent flare-ups.

      How Can Flare-ups Be Prevented?

      Eczema outbreaks can usually be avoided or the severity lessened by following these simple tips.

      Moisturize frequently
      Avoid sudden changes in temperature or humidity
      Avoid sweating or overheating
      Reduce stress
      Avoid scratchy materials, such as wool
      Avoid harsh soaps, detergents and solvents
      Avoid environmental factors that trigger allergies (for example, pollen, mold, dust mites, and animal dander)
      Be aware of any foods that may cause an outbreak and avoid those foods

  23. QUESTION:
    ITCHY RASH- ALLERGY RASH?
    I have this horrible, itchy rash. I know it is an allergy from sonething I came in contact with. I have taken an allergy pill daily to help subside, but I have had this for a week. Doctor said use oatmeal bath and cream, but it is unbearable. When I took the bath, it would spread, so I have started using the oatmeal mix from a cup and rubbing on my skin. Also, I have used a benedryl spray. And, I use the cream, Protopic twice a day. By evening and night time, I am miserable from the rubbing frmo clothes and in the bed.

    Any suggestions on QUICK home rememdies to subside the itchy and rid the allergic rash???? I am wanting to get rid of this and the DR was not too helpful to prescribe something better.

    PLEASE HELP.!!!!

    This is nothing other than a rash, I have had it before, but usually in the spring. And being winter, I have to stay clothed. It looks like tiny red bumps on the lower part of my legs.

    • ANSWER:
      Take Claritin (generic is Lortadine), 10mg, twice daily. You can take a benedryl, but it makes me really tired and can upset your stomach. My daughter gets this and it really itches her badly. I usually give her benedryl to start, then 4 hrs later, a claritin, and then in the evening. It takes about 2 days to be gone totally.

      I also got the Aveeno oatmeal cream. (You can get benedryl cream, but can't use it if you take benedryl orally. Benedryl is very sensitive and you have to be careful with it. You can choose to just use the cream and then not worry about it orally).

      If the claritin doesn't work after 24 hours, switch to Zyrtec. But get the higher doseage and only take it once per day. We've found - for her rash, the Claritin/Lortadine works best, but the benedryl gets rid of it within two hours, but the claritin keeps it away. (she weighs all of 90# if you are wondering about the doseage.)

      If you need to soak your legs, you can use Epsom Salt or simple baking soda. This sometimes helps dry it up if it isn't a dry rash (I'm adding this just to give you an alternative, if it is what my daughter gets, this won't make much of a difference)

  24. QUESTION:
    how do you fight eczema? besides cortisone?

    • ANSWER:
      I have atopic dermatitis, the clinical term for eczema.I've had it all of my life,over forty years.
      Cortisone is just a part of the treatment.You don't have to use it for every rash that you get.Keeping the skin moist is the most important thing that you can do.
      1.Never ever use soap.Soap is drying,even the so-called moisturizing soaps.Use Cetaphil Lotion Cleaner and Bar Cleaner.After cleaning,you need to replace the moisture that you took out of the skin by applying a non-scented,non-irritating moiturizing lotion.Cetaphil Cream and Eucerin Cream are the best.Remember to moisturize frequently during the day.After cleaning hands,you need to moisturize.Cetaphil Lotion allows you to clean your hands with out water.Purel can also be used for some hand cleaning.Isopropyl Alcohol based rinseless cleaners are gemtler cleaning method to the full-blown water and cleaner method.
      2. Realize that you have hypersensitive skin and cannot use the majority of beauty products available.You need to stay away for anything that contains lanolin,Retin-A,retinol,AHA acids,Sugar acids,peeling agents,benzocaine,petroleum jelly ,harsh detergents,alpha-olefin sulfonates,fatty alcohol sulfattes,secondary alkane sulfonates,scented products,glycolic acids,benzoyl peroxide,salicylic acid.(If you are unfortunate and get acne ask a dermatoligist for gentler treatments).
      3.Avoid washing your clothes in scented detergents and fabic softener.Same thing for sheets,pilllowcases,et cetera.
      4.Wear soft natural fabrics like cotton.Dermatologists recommend cotton because it lets the perspiration evaporate from the skin.Polyester traps the moisture near the skin which makes the irritation worse.Dermatologists would really prefer that dermatitis patients not sweat excessively;perspiration also leaches moisture from the skin.
      The newer moisture wicking sports fabrics are okay as long as they are soft and keep the perspiration away from the skin.
      Wool has to be lined or layers have to be worn between the fabric and the skin(tee shirts,,long pantsliners).
      5.Wear gloves when cleaning.For wet work,rubber gloves over cotton glove liners(available in the beauty section of pharmacies).For dry,dusty work,fabric gloves are fine.Wear gloves when peeling citrus fruits(lemons,oranges,limes),
      pineapple,tomatoes,
      garlic,onions,potatoes.
      6.Don't soak yourself in really hot water(very drying).Use very gentle bath cleaners like the Cetaphil bar cleaner,Aveeno Colloidal Oatmeal bath powder and bath/shower oil.Aveeno also makes a Colloidal oatmeal-based shave gel.
      7.Keep your nails short and clean. Never wear nail polish.
      8.Wear a sunblock containing avobenzone,titanium or zinc ,PABA-free being the best.
      9.To get rid of the oozing type rash,you can dry it out by using Bluborro astringent powder.You'll be left with the dry-type rash which may clear up faster...but it all depends on how your skin is feeling.
      10.Take an antihistamine pill;allergies,eczema,
      asthma,are related.
      11.Be patient and try not to get stressed.Stress makes the rash worse.
      Other medications are available by prescription,but there are two to avoid:Protopic and Elidel have been shone to increase the risk of skin cancer.
      I have found that over the counter Cortaid with moisturizers works as well as any of the prescription medications. Some rashes take a long time to heal;my worst rash lasted for four years and I went to the dermatologist and took prescription medications the whole time.The doctor said that the Cetaphil moisturizing cream was the most important thing to use because the lack of a moisture-barrier seems to be a cause of the itching,scratching,oozing, burning rash-cycle.

  25. QUESTION:
    What is deshidrosis, symptoms, and cures?
    It's a skin condition

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dyshidrosis/DS00804
      Dyshidrosis, also known as dyshidrotic eczema or pompholyx, is a skin condition in which small, fluid-filled blisters (vesicles) occur on the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet, or both.

      The blisters that occur in dyshidrosis generally last around three weeks and cause intense itching. Once the blisters of dyshidrosis dry, cracks and grooves (fissures) form, which can be painful.

      Treatment for dyshidrosis most often includes topical creams, wet compresses and ultraviolet light therapy to improve appearance and ease symptoms. Signs and symptoms of dyshidrosis include:

      Small, itchy bumps that gradually progress to a rash made up of fluid-filled blisters (vesicles)
      Intense itching
      Cracks or grooves (fissures) on your fingers or toes
      Pain, especially with large blisters

      The small, fluid-filled blisters (vesicles) most commonly occur on the palms and fingers of your hands. They may also occur on the soles and toes of your feet. The blisters usually last about three weeks. A treatment plan for dyshidrosis may include:

      Corticosteroid creams or ointments. Your doctor may prescribe high-potency corticosteroid topical creams to help speed the disappearance and improve the appearance of the blisters, and to treat the cracks and fissures that occur after the blisters have dried. In severe cases, your doctor may prescribe oral steroids.
      Compresses. Wet or cold compresses can help alleviate itching, increase the effectiveness of the topical creams and minimize blisters.
      Antihistamines. Your doctor may recommend anti-itching medications called anti-pruritics or antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or loratadine (Claritin, Alavert, others), to help alleviate itching.
      Phototherapy. If these treatments aren't effective, your doctor may recommend a special kind of ultraviolet light therapy called psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA). This treatment combines exposure to ultraviolet light (phototherapy) with drugs that help make your skin more receptive to the effects of ultraviolet light (psoralens). A newer type of ultraviolet B light known as narrow-band ultraviolet B also may be of help in some people.
      Immune-suppressing ointments. These medications, such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel), may be helpful when other treatment options haven't worked. But because they suppress the immune system, skin infections may be more likely.
      Botulinum toxin injections. Some doctors may consider recommending botulinum toxin injections to treat severe cases of dyshidrosis. However, this is a relatively new treatment option that has not yet gained acceptance among all physicians.

  26. QUESTION:
    Home remedies in aiding Eczema ........?
    My daughter has Eczema and she has a small break out every now and then. Usually when I take her to the doctor they give her a cream similar to hydrocortisone or Cortaid. I was told by a friend of the family that those creams have steroids in them and can also thin your skin with excessive use. Well my daughter has had this on going break out for the 6 months off and on and I think that her body has become immune to the creams prescribed by the doctor and the over the counter creams don't seem to work anymore. I know there has to be something all natural that I can use for her. Maybe something that I can even make at home. If anyone knows.............PLEASE HELP. I would greatly appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      I have atopic dermatitis,the medical name for eczema and I have had it for 40 + years.Here is some advice:

      1.Flare ups can take time to heal.Medications keep the flare ups from getting too out of hand.My worst flare up was on my hands.I had the rash on my hands for four years;I was unsder doctor's care the whole time.

      2.There is no cure for eczema,only treatments. Forget all-natural "cures" because they DO NOT WORK!!(Remember,I've had this condition for over 40 years;I know from experience that
      "natural" and "hypoallergenic" doesn't mean that they are good choices for atopic skin).Having sensitive skin means that certain products,natural or not,can cause allergic reactions in the skin .

      3.Get rid of all soaps,all scented products.Soaps are drying,period.Drying ingredients exacerbate the itch,which leads to scratching,whick breaks the skin,which causes the oozing,redness... The most important thing that you can do is keep the skin from getting too dry.Cleaning with Cetaphil Lotion Cleanser,or Cetaphil Bar cleanser,keeps the skin from losing too much moisture.After cleaning up,a moisturizing cream is to be applied.Cetaphil makes an excellent cream mosturizer.Some people like Eucerin cream.Water is an irritant to atopic skin,so try not to wash hands a lot;Cetaphil can be used without water,you just put it on,"lather up" and repeat,then wipe off the cleaner.

      4. Cortaid with moisturizers works just as well as any prescription medication.I've used prescription hydrocortisone cream,Lidex and Prednisone(not recommended,because it lasts for as long as you take it,then you are left with the rash and the side effects of the steroid).I also tried Protopic and luckily hated it;it burned so I didn't use it.I say luckily because Protopic and Elidel,the newest drugs are under investigation for causing an increased risk of skin cancer.Just remember that some flare ups last for a long time(my worst lasted for four years).Being patient is one of the hardest things to do but it is something that a person with atopic dermatitis must have.

      5. Aveeno makes some great products for itchy,sensitive skin.Aveeno Bath Powder with Colloidal Oatmeal and Aveeno Bath and Shower Oil with Colloidal Oatmeal are fantastic.

      6.The weepy form of eczema can be soothed with wet dressings made with Bluborro powder.The Bluborro will dry the ooze so you can deal with the rash.

      7.Stay away from Vaseline,any product that contains lanolin,benzocaine,aha or sugar acids,retinols,any greasy preparation,or any cream that contains an antihistamine(oral antihistamines are okay,just not in a cream or lotion that goes directly on the skin).

      8.Having excema even has an effect on the clothes that can be worn.Dermatologists prefer that their patients wear cottons and soft,natural fibers.Polyester retains perspiration which can cause problems.The soft moisture-wicking fabrics are okay.Wool is to be lined or a person will have to wear a soft layer underneath the wool(t-shirts,camisoles,pantliners)so it doesn't touch the skin and make the skin itch.Fabric detergents and fabric softeners used to clean clothes have to be unscented.

      9.Educate yourself.I started reading up on skin conditions as a teenager.Dermatologists often write books with advice on how to deal with certain conditions.I'll list them in the sources.

      10 Eczema,allergies and asthma often go hand-in-hand.An antihistamine is to be taken to deal with this.

      11. My doctor said to avoid doing any wet work if at all possible(no doing dishes,no washing the car,et c.).If wet work couldnot be avoided,cotton gloves worn under rubber gloves had to be worn;the cotton gloves are available in the beauty sections of pharmacies.Lined rubber gloves are not good enough.

  27. QUESTION:
    please help??
    i have a three year old child, who suffers from eczama. i just about try everything to help her itchy and dry skin.i mean it is so bad that she scratches until it bleeds. right now her doctor has her on desonide cream, vaseline and benadril. it only seems to help for a while, but it doesnt cure it. can anyone give me some advice who has delt with this skin disorder?

    • ANSWER:
      Ask your Dr about trying Elidel or Protopic. Both are newer immune modifiers used to treat eczema and approved for use in children. Both these medicines now carry warnings about the potential development of lymphoma but there have been zero actual cases of lymphoma proved to be caused by these medicines so why they got this strong warning is confusing to me. I've used both medicines and thought they carried less risk than topical corticosteroids although I did only use them on localized areas of itchy skin.
      reference article
      Topical Calcineurin Inhibitors Labeling: Putting the "Box" in Perspective
      Robert S. Stern
      Arch Dermatol. 2006;142:1233-1235

      Another option might be adding fish oil to the child's diet. Ask your physician if this is appropriate and if so how much a child would need to take. Oatmeal baths would also help with her itching and help calm her skin. Aveeno makes a good oatmeal bath and oatmeal lotion. good luck

      http://www.elidel.com/index.jsp?usertrack.filter_applied=true&NovaId=3350119491241555405

      http://www.protopic.com/

  28. QUESTION:
    what would be the best thing for my teenage daughter that has eczema on her arms?
    She is a teenager and has mild Eczema on both of her arms. It started to reduce when she stopped picking at it but it has still not gone away. I have done research and found that there really is no cure for eczema but you can help it. She only wears cotton clothes and she seems to not be allergic to anything like when she eats a certain food it doesnt flare up or if she were to go by a certain tree. She has very dry sensitive skin and Eczema has had a huge impact on her life and we are just trying to find a way to help it. The Eczema doesnt itch nor is it oozy or flaky. They seem to just be bad red bumps on the backs of her arm. Please help us with any suggestions you may have :) Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Some common triggers of eczema (dermatitis) is sweating, tight or abrasive clothing, cold and dry air, emotional distress, food, or soaps and detergents. So of course, the first thing you want to do is find out if any of these might be causing an outbreak. Secondly, you want to control her dry skin by using emollients and non irritating soaps like neutrogena, dove, or cetaphil. A good little tip to keep in mind is that if you can see through the soap then more then likely it is free from irritating products that could make her dermatitis worse. You want to decrease the frequency of bathing and avoid using hot water which can make her skin worse and avoid wash cloths and scrubs. Most importantly, you want to apply an emollient (Eucerin, Cetaphil, Nivea, Keri) after showering. Make sure that her skin is slightly damp when applying the emollient to lock in the moisture and reducing her dry skin. Lastly, if you find that she is still not getting any relief you can use topical steroid to control inflammation and itching. If you do use this option then be sure to apply the steroid before the emollient to increase the local absorption.

      If the corticosteroids still does not control her dermatitis then I suggest seeing her physician who can prescribe a stronger medication (Elidel or Protopic). Hope this helps.

  29. QUESTION:
    SEVERE dry skin + eczema!! Dermatologist PLEASE help me :(?
    hi I have a family history of eczema. That is along with asthma, allergies and such. Well my eczema is REALLY bad. Mostly on my face and my scalp. It's not bumps or anything like that though. I get REALLY dried up. I do drink water, a lot. I cut back on sodas by a large amount. I only drink maybe one regular bottle or can every 2 weeks at most. I drink a similar amount of water at least three times a day. I know it's not the suggested amount, I'm working on it.

    Anyway my face usually has a lot of dry patches like around my ears, mouth, nose, eye brows and chin. It itches all the time and often stings as well. It all just feels like razor cuts all over my face.

    My hair also is worst. dandruff every where all the time. I can't even pat it without looking like I just came from the beach. I have tried everything for both.

    For my face the only thing I *KNOW* works is Protopic but I'm reading it can give you Cancer?!? I stopped using it after reading this and now I am back at square one. For my hair I am using Neutrogena?s Extra Strength T-Gel. That worked the first time.. not anymore.

    So what are some good moisturizers? I've tried everything from Aveeno, Heads & Shoulders, Cocobutter, Selsun blue.. nothing works!! I've been to a Dermatologist THREE TIMES already. it is a waste. They give me stuff which seems like a temporary fix. It is REALLY horrible when getting my hair cut its like they dumped wood shavings everywhere.

    I am a clean person. I have tried to wash my face three times a week, washing with warm water, washing with cold, washing with hot.. then i figure maybe THAT is whats making my face dry so I stop one week, that doesnt work so I start over this time trying out different lotions and mositurizers.. I am just sick of having to find decent combinations and none work. It is a waste of time and money. It is now winter so basically I just carry a small tube of vaseline all day around.

    Can someone PLEASE offer me a better alternative for my face and scalp THANK YOU.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Sounds like the skin reactions are very very similar to what I was having two to three years ago right after I had poisoned my liver with too much toxic micro-nutritional supplements for too long - when I never even considered it was toxic. After the poisoning was identified I began having severe Urticaria allergic reactions to foods meds creams and my own sweat and who knows what other toxins, while my weakened immune system would then also promote fungal infections. I eventually learned to make the right organic nutritional choices that allowed my organs and immune system to rebuild and recover.

      Poor quality and/or low cost micro-nutrition that easily weakens one's immune system, will cause/ allow/ promote diabetes types of fungal infections and itch rash diseases and almost any other disease, even if one might be very very young or has never been ?overweight.?

      IF YI - my own skin-Urticaria issues have cost about ,500 in the last three years to learn what I now know - which is that ALL skin diseases are strongly related to one's micro-nutrition and/or toxic absorption and/or hygiene and/or parasites.

      Since doctors were not very helpful and it ?almost? took too long to learn what I now try to teach others, I now take a little time each week to help others understand the need for non-toxic and ?adequate? micro-nutritional absorption in the gut AND for good hygiene - which will then prevent or minimize every ?dis-ease? I am aware of.

      My easily triggered allergic reactions continually cause small water blisters under the top layer of skin along with skin fevers and pruritus itches and also rashes and then long term scaling. When my malady was at its worst - I used to have allergic itches to my own sweat that I was burning off after showering or during exercise or when parts of my body got hot - during a time in my life when I used to have considerable toxins stored within my body fat, along with a ?very? weakened immune and filter systems that could/would not ?elminate? these strong toxins into a stool. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholinergic_urticaria .

      Monistat_7 and Desenex are moist-area anti-fungals and Monistat_Derm and Head_&_Shoulders are also anti-fungals, but you really need to see an MD and do more internet research to better understand how difficult it is for an MD to diagnose serious skin maladies. Use meds that are prescribed in a very-minimal way so that your body?s immune system's and skin/ organs can repair and grow stronger, which will then prevent reoccurrences in the future. After I began using a very thin petrolatum based skin cream I inadvertently used too much until I was in the ER with severely swollen lymph glands, that made me think I might have contracted lymphoma.

      Since when I was an asthmatic teen and learned I would have severe reactions when I 'accidentally' inhaled or used 'any' deodorants, and could not eat cinnamon stuff without having an anaphylactic reaction - because cinnamon has some toxins that are strong enough to substitute for pesticides, my life long triggers have taught me to use hypo-allergenic non-perfumed soaps in a minimal way and to sometimes powder different portions of my body with cornstarch to help minimize yeast infections; especially whenever my micro-nutritional absorption within my gut has been less than was ?necessary? to ?adequately? repair my body?s immune system, organs, and skin on a daily basis.

      I eventually learned that itching or rashes are symptoms of maladies that could become much worse if not healed with better non-toxic and more ?dense? micro-nutritional choices. FYI - The most nutritionally dense foods that have been documented by the USDA are predominately found within the very expensive calories from leafy green vegetables.

      Even though I might not have answered your question as ?specifically? as you may have wanted, to help you with simple and concise information on ALL itch rash illnesses and for short and long term solutions to them ALL - the following link has considerable info within a ?report? I recently posted on Y_A:

      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091113104039AAbnGet

      The report at qid=20091113104039AAbnGet is an accumulation of my own investigations into itch rash illnesses that are due to my own non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, even though I have a fairly low BMI of 26.

      Finally, because I am not an MD who could diagnose you ?personally,? I feel I should add that although I have seen that most root problems for 'skin' issues for myself and others has usually ?always? been from long and or short term allergic reactions to 'something' or poor hygiene COMBINED WITH a weakened lymph liver kidney skin and immune systems - IF the following symptoms would ever occur - I ?think? the worst rash one might possibly have quickly acquired is from deadly bacterial meningitis, ALTHOUGH bacterial meningitis would be VERY RARE.

      The two quotes below are from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterial_Meningitis

      ?IF a rash is present, it may indicate a particular cause of meningitis; for instance, meningitis caused by meningococcal bacteria may be accompanied by a characteristic rash.?

      ?The MOST common symptoms of meningitis are headache and neck stiffness associated with fever, confusion or altered consciousness, vomiting, and an inability to tolerate light (photophobia) or loud noises (phonophobia). SOMETIMES, especially in small children, only nonspecific symptoms may be present, such as irritability and drowsiness.?

      For further details see: http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/about/faq.html

      I truly truly hope that what you might rapidly learn in the next few minutes will help you to decide on the correct choices that will remedy your painful malady in the future.

      My best to you and yours,

      AI ? self taught nutritionIsT >[(-:]

      PS - IF YI - the nutrition info I have learned is posted at: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091101184933AA0kQ63 .

  30. QUESTION:
    What ingredients in lotion should i stay away from if i have Atopic dermatitus?
    i have horrible skin, i use cetaphil cream but it really doesn't work that well and i still have bad rashes. i wanna try shea butter and coconut oil but i need to know what things are harmful to skin like mine, like alcohol or Fragrances.

    • ANSWER:
      You really have to read the ingredient label of each specific product. Some cocoa butter creams will have fragrances and some might not. Avoid soaps that dry the skin, perfumes, and scratchy clothing or bedding. Avoid possible allergens that cause a rash or make a rash worse. These may include dust and dust mites, animal dander, and certain foods, such as eggs, peanuts, milk, wheat, or soy products. Talk to your doctor first to determine whether allergens are contributing to your atopic dermatitis.

      You may need medicine to heal your rash and reduce itching.

      Topical corticosteroids (such as hydrocortisone, betamethasone, and fluticasone) are the most common and effective treatment for atopic dermatitis.7 They are used until the rash clears and may be used to prevent atopic dermatitis flares. Topical medicines, such as creams or ointments, are applied directly to the skin.

      Calcineurin inhibitors (pimecrolimus and tacrolimus) are topical immunosuppressants-medicines that weaken your body's immune system. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommends caution when prescribing or using Elidel (pimecrolimus) cream and Protopic (tacrolimus) ointment because of a potential cancer risk.8 The FDA also stresses that these medicines only be used as directed and only after trying other treatment options. Calcineurin inhibitors are not approved for children younger than 2 years of age.

      Antihistamines (such as diphenhydramine and hydroxyzine) are often used to treat itching and to help you sleep when severe night itching is a problem. But histamines are not always involved in atopic dermatitis itching, so these medicines may not help all people who have the condition.4 Don't give antihistamines to your child unless you've checked with the doctor first.

      Antibiotic, antiviral, or antifungal medicines are used to treat an infected rash.

      The following are different types of moisturizers to consider:

      The moisturizers for scaly eczema would be a good choice if you have a lot of flaking without a flare because they can sting if applied to open areas on the skin.
      The emollient moisturizers are a low-cost option, especially if you are in the middle of a flare-up, because they are not irritating.
      The new ceramide moisturizers help the skin heal faster during a flare, but the only low-cost option does not have published data proving it is effective. If you can afford them, these moisturizers would be a great choice with or without a flare.http://www.webmd.com/allergies/tc/atopic-dermatitis-treatment-overview
      http://dermatology.about.com/od/atopicdermatitis/a/atopic_treat.htm

  31. QUESTION:
    Please help us identify!! Rosacea? Psoriasis?
    Please help identify! My husband has this rash on his hand and often on his face (cheeks and nose). It often flakes off, sometimes breaks open and weeps clear fluid. He has had it since he was a teenager. We can't figure out a trigger because it seems to happen randomly. Doctors have said its psoasis, rosacea, eczema, impetigo(sp?).
    He has tried creams, ointments, steroids.
    They seem to help a little bit but not much. The steroids cleared it up but of course you can't continue those.
    What has seemed to have the most effect is very gentle face cleaning wipes.
    Please help us identify this! We would love to get rid of it!
    Here is a picture of the rash on the hand.
    It's very red all the time.
    http://i.imgur.com/cdYlSl.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      Seems like psoriasis.

      But only a dermatologist after proper examination and maybe a biopsy if needed can tell.

      Psoriasis is inflamed skin covered with white/silvery flakes. The discharge ( clear fluids ) is common in psoriasis. It happens mostly in big patches ( happens to me also ) and gets worse if you are scratching the area often.

      Rosacea is mostly inflamed skin ( red ) often with spots that look like acne. I don't think this is the case.

      I am on the psoriasis and other dermatitis guilt here in Greece and I've seen lots of patients with different types of dermatitis.

      I can see from the picture that he is scratching the area and this is normal because a big patch like this ( yes it is considered big ) itches.

      He should stop scratching and start a proper treatment. The doctor would prescribe a corticosteroid cream ( this is the first treatment every patient with a dermatitis like this gets )
      Example of corticosterois that help fast : Dovobet , Butavate ( you don't need a prescription for those )
      Another non steroid cream that works great also is Protopic. It has no cortisone in and this is the only cream for dermatitis that can be used on the face. It can be used even close to the eyelids and in other sensitive areas such as close to the genitals. Don't use cortisone on the face. Cortisone creams for a dermatitis that needs a month of treatment maybe to go away can make the skin thin ( stretch marks ) and you don't want that on the face.

      He can apply the cream once a day, everyday until the patch has completely cleared. The smaller the patch the easiest and fastest it will go away. The older the patch also the more difficult to treat.
      In dermatitis it's always about listening to your body. If the psoriasis is not aggressive, after the skin has cleared after a treatment it will remain clean for long. If the psoriasis is aggressive it can flair up within days.
      Use the topical creams everyday until it clears up and you will see how it will go and you are going to try something else only if needed.

      What happens in psoriasis ( and eczema ) ? Genes involved in the reproduction of skin cells are over working. In normal people skin cells reproduce once a month ( up to 40 days ) approximately. In psoriasis they reproduce once a day or two. That causes inflammation and flakes ( dead skin cells ). In other words it's something like Dandruff.

      What triggers psoriasis and eczema? Fever, cold/flu, stress, anxiety, climate, other conditions, toxins from food and products we use everyday.

      If he has it only on his hands and some parts of the face I wouldn't go on stronger treatments such as biologicals ( Enbrel, Stellara, Humira ) or pills, I'd stick with the topical treatments.
      Another thing to try is Puva phototherapies. Ask your dermatologist about where you can have them.
      Try this only if sun exposure during the summer is helping his skin to heal. If not, don't bother.

      He has to avoid : Red whine, beer, chocolate, red meat, fried food, fish.

      p.s. : If you need any help you can contact me through email.

      Gluck

  32. QUESTION:
    ezcema problems?
    anybody know what cures ezcema

    • ANSWER:
      I don't really believe it is "curable" by definition but you can definately keep it under control.

      My daugther has been dealing with this since pretty much birth, and is three now.

      I would go to your doctor, or your child's if it is he/she who has it. Just to see it's severity etc. And also to get their recommendations.

      My daugthers doctor intiatially said to try Aquaphor, and/or Eucerin. Aquaphor I didn't like so much because it's consistency is very greasy, like vaseline. I didn't rub in well. Eucerin is pretty good, but if the ecezma is very severe it might not do much. Both these products are expensive so be prepared, but they do work.

      My daugthers eczema really didn't clear up with these, *and from what I understand should be used all the time and are more preventative than "curative" so the doctor prescribed her Protopic. It is a skin creme that really works very very well. It usually clears my daugthers outbreaks up rather quickly.

      Recently she went through a really bad flare up, and when we went in cause it hurt and was very red he prescribed a good Hydrocotizone creme for her. It helps bring down itching and redness. Now if it is for you *an adult* then I would say grab any old hydrocortison off the self and go at her. Her script was I think for a higher concentration of the active ingredient, like 2 percent instead of the one percent that comes in most.

      Those are some of the suggestions I have found work for us. We also make sure to use a gentle soap like Dove. *my husband while he doesn't have eczema has very sensitive skin*. Also if this is for your kiddo, don't let her/him play in the tub long once the water is sudsy, with lots of soap and ick. Let him/her play in the clean, and clear water BEFORE you wash em up. Once they've pretty much got their fill of playing wash em up and take em out.

      I hope this helps. Trust me, I don't have eczema but I have dealt with it and it can be a big pain.

      Good Luck

  33. QUESTION:
    My daughter has eczema & her fingers stay raw &cracked.?
    I have used steroid crms., lotions, antibiotic creams(Rx), bandaids, elidel, even super glue to hold the cracks together. She uses Dove soap only. What else can I do?

    • ANSWER:
      I am an atopic dermatitis patient of 40+ years. Throw away the soap!!.Soap is a very bad thing to use,it's drying and makes the eczema worse. I am surprised that your doctor(was the Dr. a dermatologist?) failed to tell you that!You need to go out a buy your daughter products from the Cetaphil line.They have a bar cleanser for shower and bath,and a lotion cleanser,a moisturizing lotion and a moisturizing cream. Stay away from any highly scented loyions,or lotions that contain lanolin. Stay away from any preparations that contain the suffix -caine.They will not relieve the itch,just make the rash worse.I also had a very bad case of eczema on my hands;it lasted for nearly 4 years,and I was under a dermatologist's care for the whole time.
      Medications that I used were a moisturizing hydrocortisone cream that my dermatologist made up,and is now available over the counter(Cortaid with moisturizers) or Lidex.There are two new medicines out there,but until further testing and studies have proved they do not excacerbate the chances of developing skin cancer,I'd stay away from them(Protopic and Elidel are their names). Taking an antihistamine was something my dermatologist recommended because allergies and eczema go hand in hand.When the Cetahpil is used,follow the directions for the no-water cleaning.Simply lather up and wipe off,and do it again until the skin is clean,then apply the medicine and then the moisturizer.You could use water with the Cetaphil,too,but water can be an irritant ;if atopic skin is exposed to too much water(and we are always washing our hands,stripping moisture that we don't have from the skin).Your daughter should not do any wet-work unless she wears gloves,and then she can only do 10 minutes worth of work because the hands start to perspire,aggravating the rash.

      Your daughter needs to get several pairs of cotton gloves from the beauty section of the pharmacy and apply gobs of the Cetaphil cream to her hands,put on the gloves and let the cream sink in;she can do this at night while she sleeps.She's also going to have to keep applying the lotion when her skin feels dry.
      The hydrocortisone cream is to be applied several times a day(3-4 is enough).But getting better takes time and patience...I know it's hard and I've been through ot countless times over the years.

      Does your daughter have a dermatologist?If she just goes to a pediatrician,she's not going to get the proper care that she needs. I am providing you with some source material that has helped me over the years.There is no cure for eczema but we eczema patients are always looking for ways to aleviate the suffering.The link and books can give you ideas and help you find a routine that will work for your daughter.

  34. QUESTION:
    hand dermititus cures?
    i am 15 and have developed hand dermatitis from work experience. i have finished and not going back so i have no worry of making it worse. i have been using e45 hand lotion for the past 3 days and after a while they just dry up again. someone help? what should i do to cure it and what do i need to avoid to stop the matter from becoming worse?

    • ANSWER:
      A daily bath or shower. Use only mild soaps such as Dove, Basis, or Oil of Olay, keep water cool or lukewarm, and limit bath time to 15?20 minutes. Moisturizing. Within three minutes after bathing, and then throughout the day, use a plain, fragrance-free ointment or cream to seal in moisture and protect skin from allergens and irritants. Many dermatologists recommend a thick, oily moisturizer such as petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Newer alternatives include barrier-repair creams that not only moisturize the skin but also help rebuild it with an active ingredient called ceramide. Some ceramide-containing creams such as CeraVe and TriCeram are available over the counter, while others such as Atopiclair and Mimyx are available by prescription only. Per-container costs range from to 0. In a small study published in 2002, researchers at the University of California at San Francisco found that TriCeram significantly improved stubborn atopic dermatitis lesions within three weeks. Appropriate use of gloves. Use plastic gloves ?preferably with a cotton liner to wick away perspiration ?whenever you use harsh soaps, cleaners, and other chemicals. Use an automatic dishwasher to minimize exposure. Also use gloves during cold and dry temperatures, or when handling laundry, because fabrics can deplete the skin of moisture. edical Treatments for Hand Dermatitis home treatments fail, consult a doctor, dermatologist, or ergy specialist. He or she may recommend additional oidance strategies, help you develop a good skin-care utine, and prescribe medical treatments such as: Phototherapy, which involves exposure to ultraviolet light A combination of phototherapy and a drug called psoralen Oral antihistamines Tar treatments, which use itch-reducing chemicals A short course of oral corticosteroids Immunomodulators. Two such drugs ?Elidel and Protopic ?are approved for treating moderate eczema, but they?re recommended only for patients for whom other treatments have failed. In 2006 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring a ?black box? warning on product packaging to alert doctors and patients to potential cancer risks.Also ask your doctor about wet-wrap therapy, which involves the application of wet bandages after applying moisturizers and prescribed medication. Some studies suggest that one or two weeks of wet-wrap therapy applied before bedtime may help rehydrate and calm skin affected by severe eczema. Although hand dermatitis can seem like an intractable problem, it doesn?t have to permanently affect your fingers and palms. With appropriate self-care ?and medical treatments if necessary ?you can rid yourself of this common nuisance and restore your hands to their normal condition.

  35. QUESTION:
    Why are the sides of my nose red and dry/flaky?
    Iv had this problem now for about a year, nothings seems to work and I'm out of ideas! HELP !
    Iv tried not putting anything on it, iv tried putting lotion on it, iv tried hydra cortisone cream. None of that helped , i mentioned it to my doctor and she gave me some Protopic.. says tacrolimus ointment 0.1% on it? This is what has worked the best so far but its still there, the flakes are gone but its still really red and chapped. Any suggestions ??? I'm desperate !

    • ANSWER:
      "Dandruff is a condition in which dead skin cells are shed heavily from the scalp. Dandruff - medically know as seborrhoeic dermatitis, also troubles the face, ear and groin and other body parts. It makes the skin flaky and crusty, causes itching and irritation of the skin."
      http://www.dailyglow.com/askquestion/get-rid-of-dandruff-on-face-using-home-treatment-i

      i suffered from dandruff on the sides of my nose for years. i then started using anti-dandruff shampoo when i washed my hair and i would carefully rub some into the affected areas of my nose. years of redness, crusting and flaking cleared up very quickly. http://www.medicinenet.com/seborrhea/page2.htm recommends:

      "Shampoos: Here are some ingredients in medicated shampoos that you can look for to help control dandruff of the scalp. All are available over the counter.
      tar (T/Gel)
      salicylic acid
      zinc pyrithione (like Head & Shoulders)
      selenium sulfide (Selsun Blue)
      ketoconazole (Nizoral)"

      an anti-fungal cream containing 1% clotrimazole is also worth a go as well as over the counter 0.5% or 1% strength hydrocortisone cream.

      Tacrolimus ointment you have been using works by suppressing the immune system in the area it is applied. "Tacrolimus ointment is used for the treatment of moderate to severe atopic dermatitis in adults and children who have normal immune systems and have not responded to other topical treatments or in whom other topical treatments cannot be used." (taken from http://www.medicinenet.com/tacrolimus_ointment/article.htm )

      you were prescribed the maximum dose straight off and it seems like your doctor is treating your problem with a sledge hammer. has she taken a skin scraping to be analysed so that she knows what she is treating? if nothing works for you ask her for a referral to a dermatologist for expert treatment.

      best wishes, A x

  36. QUESTION:
    Vitiligo on my penis?
    1)If vitiligo starts occurring in small patches on some parts of the body does it limit itself to that part or does it also spread to the other parts of the body?

    2)How often does it spread and how often does it not, what are the chances of it affecting the patient?s entire body?

    3)Ok, here?s the problem . . . I?ve recently started noticing small patches of white skin appearing on the foreskin of my penis and even smaller patches appearing on the shaft and scrotum. The white patches look like otherwise normal skin, no itching, no bumps, nothing. The strange thing is that it seems to be spreading, ever so slowly. So . . .

    a)Is this necessarily vitiligo or something else, maybe some other kind of partial pigment loss?

    b)Will it spread to the other parts of my penis or my body for that matter?

    4)Has this ever happened to you or anyone you know? What happened, did it spread stop or cure itself ?

    5) Does vitiligo on the penis ever cure itself?

    • ANSWER:
      Vitiligo

      Last reviewed: September 11, 2010.

      Vitiligo is a skin condition in which there is a loss of brown color (pigment) from areas of skin, resulting in irregular white patches that feel like normal skin.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors

      Vitiligo appears to occur when immune cells destroy the cells that produce brown pigment (melanocytes). This destruction is thought to be due to an autoimmune problem, but the cause is unknown.

      Vitiligo may appear at any age. There is an increased rate of the condition in some families. The condition affects about 1 out of every 100 people in the United States.

      Vitiligo is associated with three other autoimmune diseases:

      Addison's disease

      Hyperthyroidism

      Pernicious anemia

      Symptoms

      Flat areas of normal-feeling skin without any pigment appear suddenly or gradually. These areas have a darker border. The edges are well defined but irregular.

      Vitiligo most often affects the face, elbows and knees, hands and feet, and genits. It affects both sides of the body equally.

      Vitiligo is more noticeable in darker-skinned people because of the contrast of white patches against dark skin.

      No other skin changes occur.

      Signs and tests

      Your health care provider can usually examine your skin to confirm the diagnosis.

      Sometimes, a health care provider may use a Wood's light. This is a handheld ultraviolet light that causes the areas of skin with less pigment to glow bright white.

      In some cases, a skin biopsy may be needed to rule out other causes of pigment loss. Your doctor may also perform blood tests to check the levels of thyroid or other hormones, and vitamin B12.

      Treatment

      Vitiligo is difficult to treat. Early treatment options include the following:

      Phototherapy, a medical procedure in which your skin is carefully exposed to ultraviolet light. Phototherapy may be given alone, or after you take a drug that makes your skin sensitive to light. A dermatologist performs this treatment.

      Medicines applied to the skin, such as:

      Corticosteroid creams or ointments

      Immunosuppressant creams or ointments, such as pimecrolimus (Elidel) and tacrolimus (Protopic)

      Topical drugs such as methoxsalen (Oxsoralen)

      Skin may be moved (grafted) from normally pigmented areas and placed onto areas where there is pigment loss.

      Several cover-up makeups or skin dyes can mask vitiligo. Ask your health care provider for the names of these products.

      In extreme cases when most of the body is affected, the remaining skin that still has pigment may be depigmented. This is a permanent change that is used as a last resort.

      It is important to remember that skin without pigment is at greater risk for sun damage. Be sure to apply a broad-spectrum (UVA and UVB), high-SPF sunscreen or sunblock and use appropriate safeguards against sun exposure.

      Support Groups

      American Vitiligo Research Foundation -- www.avrf.org

      National Vitiligo Foundation -- www.nvfi.org

      VitiligoSupport.com -- www.vitiligosupport.org

      Expectations (prognosis)

      The course of vitiligo varies and is unpredictable. Some areas may regain normal pigment (coloring), but other new areas of pigment loss may appear. Skin that is repigmented may be slightly lighter or darker than the surrounding skin. Pigment loss may get worse over time.

      Complications

      Depigmented areas are more likely to sunburn and develop certain skin cancers.

      Calling your health care provider

      Call for an appointment with your health care provider if areas of your skin lose their coloring for no reason (for example, there was no injury to the skin).

  37. QUESTION:
    what is best cure for eczema?

    • ANSWER:
      Eczema Treatment Guide

      Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is a common problem in infants and children. It usually begins between two and six months of age with very dry and sensitive skin that will then become red and extremely itchy. It often starts on the forehead, cheeks and scalp and spreads to the trunk, creases of the elbows, knees, and wrists. With scratching the rash may become raw, crusted and weepy.

      It is not yet known what causes it, but it does seem to run in families that have a history of asthma, allergies or atopic dermatitis. It is a chronic disease, but only about a third of children with infantile atopic dermatitis will continue to have problems with it as they get older.

      There is no cure for this common condition. The main treatments are aimed at controlling and preventing inflammation and itching and include avoiding triggers, frequent bathing and hydrating of the skin, liberal use of moisturizers and lubricants, and the use of steroid creams for flare ups.

      New Medications Protopic: or tacrolimus, an immunomodulator ointment that in the 0.03% strength is indicated for the treatment of moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (eczema) when other therapies have not been effective. Elidel: or pimercrolimus, is another non-steroidal cream that in the 1% strength is indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis (eczema) in children over 2 years of age.

      Lubricants
      To help with dryness, these creams, such as Eucerin, Nivea, or Lubriderm, should be used every day, even when the eczema isn't flaring-up!

      Apply right after baths within 3 minutes (and after the steroid creams) to help trap in moisture and throughout the day as needed. For severely dry skin, try using an ointment, such as Aquaphor.

      Alternative lubricants that some parents find useful include Hydrolatum and Vanicream.

      Many experts recommend avoiding moisturizing lotions, as they often don't work as well as a cream or ointment.

      Steroid Creams
      These are the main treatments for atopic dermatitis when it flares up, and should be applied right after baths (and before a lubricant) and again during the day as directed. When the rash improves, cut back on how often you are using it and then stop until the rash flares up again.

      Common steroid creams include Cutivate, Westcort and Artistocort, and Elocon.

      Avoid using prescription steroid creams on the face or in the diaper area, unless specifically instructed to do so. An over the counter 1% Hydrocortisone cream is safer in these areas.

      For severe cases of eczema, a steroid ointment may be more effective than a cream.

      If your child's eczema improves when he is on a steroid and then quickly flares up again when you stop, it may help to use a 'step down' strategy where you taper the use of the steroid and use it less often, for example every other day and then 2-3 times a week, before finally stopping it. Or use a less potent steroid, like over the counter hydrocortizone after using a prescription strength steroid like Cutivate or Elocon.

      You might also ask your doctor about one of the newer non-steroidal medications, like Protopic or Elidel.

      Bathing and Eczema
      Bathing and eczema is a controversial topic, but many people think the practice of limiting baths is old school or old fashioned. Many experts now recommend a daily bath for kids with eczema.

      A daily bath for at least 15-20 minutes helps to moisturize the skin and make it less itchy. Be sure to use a mild, nondrying soap, such as Dove, Neutrogena, Tone, Caress, Dial, Basis, or Purpose, avoid vigorous scrubbing, use a soft towel to pat the skin dry and immediately (within 3 minutes) apply a lubricating cream afterwards.

      If your child's skin is not tolerating a daily bath, limit baths to every other day or try using a soap substitute, such as Cetaphil. Avoid using bubble baths, harsh or drying soaps and keep shampoo off the affected areas.

      Itching Relief
      Atopic dermatitis is a very itchy rash, and scratching usually makes it worse, so it is important to help control itching. You can use an oral antihistamine, such as Benadryl, especially at night to help control irritability and restlessness that the itching may cause. Always apply your steroid cream to areas that itch.

      Wet or damp dressings can sometimes help with severe itching. A wet-to-wet dressing can be made by having your child wear wetted pajamas after he takes a bath and then apply a dry layer over this.

      Also, keep your child's fingernails cut short to limit the damage caused by scratching.

      Eczema Prevention
      Help prevent flare-ups by avoiding things that are known to trigger your child's eczema. These may include certain foods (cow's milk, eggs, peanut butter, fish), wool fibers and clothes, rough or tight fitting clothing, dry air, sweating, getting too hot or too cold (avoid hot or cold water), harsh soaps or chemicals, and stress.

      Swimming is allowed, but immediately shower or bathe to wash off chlorine and other chemicals and apply a moisturizer to help prevent your child's skin from drying out.

      In addition to using

      Important Reminders

      * Be patient. This is a chronic disease that usually improves and then flares-up again, but one which is usually easily managed with the above therapies.
      * Call your pediatrician if your child is not improving in 1-2 weeks with his current treatments, the itching is keeping your child awake at night, the rash is infected with pus or honey colored scabs, or if the rash becomes raw and bleeding.
      * You sometimes have to experiment to find what works best for your child's eczema.
      * Consider seeing an expert, such as a Pediatric Dermatologist if you and your Pediatrician are not able to get your child's eczema under good control.

  38. QUESTION:
    I Have Low Self Esteem And Need Help?
    Im 15 years old and suffered from eczema my whole life but it kinda healed, i dropped out of school at 7th grade and had litteraly stayed in my house for 3 years straight , i would only go out at night but rarely , and im afraid to go outside cause of looking pal and ashy , and people making fun of me again .
    i mean what should i do with my life! im always complicating suicide and attempted it twice the only reason i dont want to do it is because my mom ,she supported me this whole time and i love her so much

    • ANSWER:
      Keep your head up:) my sister has the same thing and she is 17yrs old she went 2 the doctor n they gave her some medicine she doesn't have that many outbreaks now.

      Treatment can vary depending on the appearance (stage) of the lesions. "Weeping" lesions, dry scaly lesions, or chronic dry, thickened lesions are each treated differently.

      ?Avoid anything that makes your symptoms worse. This may include food allergens and irritants such as wool and lanolin.
      ?When washing or bathing, keep water contact as brief as possible and use less soap than usual. After bathing, it is important to trap the moisture in the skin by applying lubricating cream on the skin while it is damp. Dry skin often makes the condition worse. Temperature changes and stress may cause sweating and aggravate the condition.
      ?Treat weeping lesions with soothing moisturizers, mild soaps, or wet dressings.
      ?Use mild anti-itch lotions or topical corticosteroids to soothe less severe or healing areas, or dry scaly lesions.
      ?You can treat chronic thickened areas with ointments or creams that contain tar compounds, powerful anti-inflammatory medicines, and ingredients that lubricate or soften the skin.
      ?Your health care provider may prescribe oral corticosteroids to reduce inflammation if the condition is severe.
      ?Medicines called topical immunomodulators (TIMs) may be prescribed in some cases. TIMs include tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel). These medications do not contain corticosteroids

      I hope this helps you =)

  39. QUESTION:
    What exactly is eczema? What causes it? Why does it only effects certain areas of your body?
    I had eczema since i was 4 y/o. A dermatologists told me that my eczema was caused by sudar and food coloring. i only get rashes near joints ex. back of neck, inside of elbows and knees, over and under my eyelids and sometimes under my arms
    sources and sites also would be helpful.

    • ANSWER:
      I have atopic dermatitis;I've had it for over forty years and I have lots of experience in treating the condition.The first thing you need to do is to be properly diagnosed by a dermatologist.If you already have been there are lotions and medicines that help treat the rashes.Eczema can affect the skin all oner your body,not just certain places,I've had it all over my body over the many years I've lived with this consition. Doctors really do not know why eczema exists;they just know that it's a genetic condition that predisposes the skin towards hypersensitivity.They do know what can trigger a rash.So have to avoid lots of things.
      1.Get rid of all soaps and scented products.Soaps are drying and take away the protective moisture barrier that atopic skin already has very little of and switch to Cetaphil cleansers.The cleansers come in lotion and bar forms.Aveeno Collidal Oatmeal powder is good for the bath;there is also Aveeno Colloidal Oatmeal bath/shower oil and shave gel.After cleaning you then can apply any medicines,but you will always have to apply a moisturizer,every time you clean.Cetaphil Cream moisturizer and Eucerin Cream are the most popular among dermatitis patients.
      2.Atopic Dermatitis means having hypersensitive skin.You cannot use most skin care products available because they are too harsh;even baby oil and baby lotions are too harsh.Stay away from all scented products and highly colored products.Do not use any thing with AHA acids,sugar acids,retinol,peeling agents,lanolin,benzocaine or any"-caine" derivative,greasy ointments, petrolatum( like Vaseline),ointments containing antihistamines,anything containing alpa-olefin sulfonates,secondary alkane sulfonates,alkybenzene sulfonates,fatty alcohol sulfonates.
      3.Wear soft fabrics;dermatologists prefer that their patients wear all natural cotton,silk,linen fabrics that allow the perspiration to evaporate away from the skin.Your own perspiration can trigger a rash!If you wear wool,it must be lines are you need to wear a layer of soft fabric between your skin and the wool(I do both at the same time,lined wool,tee shirts,camisoles,long underwear).Detergents and fabric softeners all need to be unscented and gentle.Your sheets and blankets need to be soft and unscratchy.
      4.Anti-perspirant deodorants need to be unscented and formulated for sensitive skins.Shampoos that are good are tar-based Neutragena and Denorex,and non-prescription strength Nizoral.Conditioners just have to be moisturizing.Scalpicin is a clear lotion that can help with scalp itch.
      5.You will need to wear gloves when doing wet work;these rubber gloves have to be worn over cotton liners that are available in the beauty sections of pharmacies.Fabric gloves need to be worn when you are doing dusty ,dry work.Latex gloves need to be worn when you handle potatoes,garlic,onions,citrus fruits,tomatoes and pineapple.These foods contain highly irritating juices;I forgot to wear my gloves when I was chopping onions,once, and I thought that my hands were on fire!I had to ice them.
      6.Over the years,some medications have become available over the counter;these are the hydrocortisone or corticosteroid creams.Cortaid is the best of these;Cortaid makes a special moisturizing formula which my dermatologist made up especially for his patients.Precription cortisone cream,Prednisone,Lidex are doctor precribed medicines.I do not recommend Protopic or Elidel,two prescription medicines that are currently being investigated to increased risk of skin cancer.I have found that the Cortaid with moisturizers and liberal use of Cetaphil moisturizing crream does just as well as any of the prescriptions I've used. The hard part is accepting that some rashes will go away,while others will take years to burn out;my worst flare up was on my hands and lasted for four years.I was on prescription medicines and visiting the dermatologist during the whole awful episode.
      You will need to take an antihistamine because dermatitis is an autoimmune disease that usually is accompanied by allergies(hayfever) and asthma.
      8.If you ever get an oozy rash,you can dry it up by using Bluborro astringent powder;just follow the directions to make a wet dressing.Drying the ooze helps the medicine work better.
      9.Wear a sunblock containing avobenzone or zinc oxide.
      10.Read up on atopic dermatitis/eczema;just get writings by qualified doctors(dermatologists only).
      11.Keep nails short and clean.Do ot scratch and try not to stress.Being highly emotional makes things worse for the skin.

      Source(s):

      Eczema Free for Life by Adnan Nasir,M.D. and Priscilla Burgess
      Your Skin:From Acne to Zits by Jerome Z. Litt,M.D.
      Your Skin:A Dermatologist's Guide to a Lifetime of Beauty and Health by Frederic Haberman,M.D. and Denise Fortino
      The National Eczema Association has a printable booklet available online(just ignore ads for the two medicines under investigation)

  40. QUESTION:
    Treatment for atopic dermatitis?
    I was born in the U.S. but I grew up in Japan. I moved to the Philippines when I was almost 13 years old. I started developing small heat rashes on my face and then on my cheek, until after a year it spread all over my entire body. That's when a dermatologist told me that I had atopic dermatitis. I heard that only babies and small children have this skin condition and only for a short term. Why did I only experience this when I was already almost 13? Until now, I still have this skin condition. I also have relatives who had the skin condition but only at a early age.

    I also have this condition on my scalp. You would think that I have dandruff but it isn't. Because of my skin condition, I have trouble sleeping at night that I also developed insomia.

    I know that there is still no known cure for atopic dermatitis but I wish someone out there will tell me what are the best and safe methods to relieve the rashes and the ITCH.
    I'm almost 23 years old so I've been having this skin condition for almost 10 years.

    • ANSWER:
      trust me.. i know the frustration. I'm 20 years old and been struggling with atopic dermatitis for the past 20 years. I was only diagnosed correctly when i was 7 or 8 years old because back then, there was little information about it. Atopic Dermatitis is skin a condition which usually affects children but in some cases, some don't grow out of it. one thing i can definitely attest to is that this skin condition is very pricey.

      The first thing you need to know is that there is no cure for atopic dermatitis, there is only prevention. There is no miracle ointment/lotion/whatever that will get rid of it. Don't worry though, when cared for correctly, we do have this so-called "remissions" which allows us to be lesion-free for a certain period of time.(weeks, months, or even years depending on how you take care of yourself)

      Second thing you have to remember is you need to consult with a doctor(preferably a dermatologist or allergologist) that can help you deal with your skin problems and other concerns(especially when you have flare-ups). You need to find a doctor you are most comfortable with because you will be working with him/her throughout your flare-ups.[From my experience, Dra. Blas and Dra. Wong-Uy in St.Lukes are really good when it comes to atopic dermatitis patients. They too have atopic dermatitis.^^]

      My doctor also stresses the importance of being patient and not stressing yourself out because most of the time, emotions affect atopic dermatitis patients.

      Maintenance is the key. You have to discover the right regimen and products for you.. trial and error. If you have dry skin, you have to moisturize, moisturizer, moisturize and limit your bath time to about 5-10minutes. You have to be careful of what you put on your skin, it plays a very big role.

      You have to avoid scratching yourself because that is one of the key causes of lesions.

      Atopic dermatitis differs to each person, so, i can't tell whether what worked for me will work for you to. Here's my regimen, hope it helps:

      For the itch: i live on anti-histamines. i take one anti-histamine(virlix/zyrtec) a day, this helps with the itch and also protects me from some triggers that i can be allergic to. they have anti-histamines that will help you sleep at night(like iterax) but they can be a little tiring, it can make you feel groggy the next day.

      I also use La Roche-Posay thermal spring water, i spray it on areas that are itchy and is a temporary relief. I don't think they have it here but another choice is the Avene thermal spring water which is available here.

      You can also put something cold on top of the itchy area, this can be a quick relief.^^

      Regimen:
      When i start to notice that i'm having a flare-up, i apply PHYSIOGEL AI cream along with protopic ointment and elica ointment. there are stronger creams out there and oral steroids when worst comes to worst but when you have extreme flare-ups, you have to consult your doctor about your medications because self-medicating will sometimes worsten your condition. Correct medication takes care of flare-ups a lot faster. St. lukes also has a phototheraphy unit that helps with flares-up.

      I apply moisturizer and sunblock everyday. Dry skin makes you a lot more itchy. Moisturizers that work for me are:
      1.) cetaphil lotion/cream
      2.) avene
      3.) la roche posay
      4.) ellgy
      5.) physiogel
      6.) elovera
      baby products and hypoallergenic products are really great, it doesn't irritate the skin as much as regular products. i have learned to live with unscented products because i get flare-ups with scented ones.

      YOU HAVE TO BE CAREFUL OF EVERYTHING THAT YOU PUT ON and COME IN CONTACT WITH YOUR SKIN.

      i also take virgin coconut oil capsules, acidophilus/bifidus, and vitamin supplements to help with my atopic dermatitis.

      oh, and for the scalp, use very mild products. i use baby shampoo to wash my hair. the dandruff like thing is called sebbhoric dermatitis.. you can use stieprox shampoo for that, it really helps.^^

      [most of the products i mentioned can be bought from pharmacies and are over-the-counter]

      Also, be aware of what kind of temperature you are most suitable with. As for me, i get flare-ups on warmer days, especially when i sweat. Summer is a big no-no for me, my skin is more comfortable in colder weather. This way, before summer comes, i can already prepare and get my skin prepped. I avoid warm places.. i'm actually planning on relocating when i graduate. the philippine climate is not skin-friendly for me.

      Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking. Having atopic dermatitis also means a certain lifestyle change.

      Basically that's it.. you have to find the most suitable relief for you. research and studying about atopic dermatitis helps a lot too. it's all about being conscious and taking good care of your skin. yes, it is hard work but it does pay off.^^

      there are a lot of products out in the market that are catering to atopic dermatitis patients:
      >sebamed
      >YUSKIN is a japanese brand that has a sensitive skin line.
      >CARENIC is a korean brand and is specifically for atopic dermatitis.
      >La Roche Posay and Avene has products specifically for AD too.
      >Cetaphil
      >Physiogel AI
      >Kiehl's
      ..and a lot, lot more.

  41. QUESTION:
    Please help my dad? It feels sad to see him like that :/?
    Uhm, idk how to start, but yeah, my dad has skin problems since he lost his job. He doesn't seem to be 'stressed' out but I know he is. It wasn't much of a problem until beginning of this year, his skin start to itch whenever he eats smtg that might be an allergen or maybe not. Until now me and my mom still can't find out why is this happening to him. My dad has consulted a few doctors and even dermatologists on his skin problem and none of them seem to be able to help him. One of them diagnosed him with eczema, and another said he has some fungus-follicle infection? My mom has been looking up for some remedies for him and some of them provided temporary relief and some doesn't. His skin has blisters when there is itch and eruption, and now his hands, legs, scalp, sides of the face are badly scarred and still itching and blistering. He applies vitamin E whenever it itches to moist it and stop the itch, but it may last only a few minutes to an hr or so. He applies some cream called moogoo, doesn't seem to help, and a controlled medicinal cream, called protopic, which has a side effect of skin cancer but seemed to provide temporary relief to his skin problems. I really hope someone out here, whether a doctor, skin specialist, or someone who had similar problem and found the cure can help my dad.
    PS: are fishes possible allergens? Nuts, beer, and egg? If there's someone here who's kind enough, please give me a list of possible things that could've triggered my dad's terrible skin problem. I would really appreciate your help so so much! Please answer me thanks lots :)

    • ANSWER:
      You're probably on the right track about the food. Just find the triggers to the eczema and stay away from them. Could be food, water, something in the house, soap or laundry detergent. We keep our son away from eggs, and some other foods. His eczema also reacts a little when his skin touches polyester. You may also try using Ivory soap when your dad bathes. Some of the other soaps may contain a trigger to his eczema.

      For your dad's immediate need to stop the itching, I'll tell you about a spray, and soaps that helped us treat our son that may help you clear up the eczema inflammation and stopped the itching.

      Salcura Gentle spray for babies cleared the rash, redness and stopped the itching for our son. There's a stronger Salcura formulation for Adults, Salcura Intensive. It's a clear spray that absorbs very quickly, not sticky or greasy.

      What?s in Salcura Gentle:
      Going by what's on the package and website, Salcura Gentle is made of a number of products, including Calendula, Dead Sea Minerals, purified water. On the box it states the following:
      "Totally free from steroids, hormones, cortisones, peroxides, alcohol, parabens and antibiotics. Not tested on animals. Contains only natural oils, minerals and vitamins providing essential nutrients to help maintain skin cells in a viable and healthy condition."

      Read my Epinion, (link below) concerning Salcura gentle and using it on our son.
      The best place I've found to buy it (price, and quick delivery) was ExpressChemist.co.uk
      Only available in Britain but they'll ship it to you fast.

      You can also consider using soaps made with Dead Sea Salts.
      We use a dead sea salt soap called Moor Mud, from Pigeon Creek Handmade Soaps
      The lady that owns the business and makes the soap has a number of soaps to choose from.
      and several websites. Or you can find something locally made in your area by a soap maker.

      Anything with Calendula, and Dead Sea salts seems to help relieve and reduce the itchiness and inflammation. But so far the Salcura is by far the best thing and we spray our son every day with it.
      Calendula is an edible variety of the marigold plant. You can grow your own and make your own ointment if you want, it's been used for centuries to heal.

      Also, consider using the ALL brand of laundry detergent, and some people have suggested getting a shower water filter helped them with their skin problems.They bought their water filter from Lowes or Home Depot.

  42. QUESTION:
    What is eczema?
    How to prevent eczema??

    • ANSWER:
      What causes eczema?

      The exact cause of atopic eczema is unknown. People inherit a tendency to the disorder, but the symptoms themselves seem to be set off by a number of 'trigger factors', for example:

      Psychological factors
      In adults, stress, anxiety, depression and other psychological factors can all influence atopic conditions. In particular, they can make the severity and flare-ups of eczema much worse.

      Irritants in the home or environment
      If you get eczema you're more likely to react to irritants which you inhale or which have contact with your skin. These include:
      Dust mites

      The fur of dogs and cats, as well as horse hair

      Certain plants

      Low humidity - dry air caused by air conditioning, central heating or frosty weather can aggravate eczema

      Overheating due to central heating and woollen or synthetic clothing can trigger itching

      Foods
      Certain foods may trigger eczema, as can the following food additives:

      Preservatives
      Parabens E214 to E218

      Sodium Benzoate E211

      Sorbic acid E200

      Antioxidants
      Butyl hydroxyanisole E320

      Butyl Hydroxytoluene E321

      Colours
      Tartrazine E102

      Erythrosine E123

      Amaranth E127

      Industrial or chemical irritants
      Certain chemicals such as detergents, biological washing powders and chlorine in swimming pools can trigger ezcema.

      Climate
      How climate affects eczema isn't proven. However, there is evidence that the condition generally improves in mountains over 1500m high, in seashore locations and humid regions.
      Atopic eczema often becomes worse in Autumn, as central heating is more widely used, leading to a reduction in room humidity.

      Studies have shown that children who are breast-fed are less likely to get eczema. This is also true when the nursing mother has avoided cow's milk in her diet. Other dietary restrictions may include eggs, fish, peanuts, and soy.

      Eczema tends to run in families. Control of stress, nervousness, anxiety, and depression can be beneficial in some cases.

      There is no cure for it but there is relief medications

      Lubricants
      To help with dryness, these creams, such as Eucerin, Nivea, Cethaphil Moisturizing Cream, or Lubriderm, should be used every day, even when the eczema isn't flaring-up!
      Apply right after baths within 3 minutes (and after the steroid creams) to help trap in moisture and throughout the day as needed.

      For severely dry skin, try using an ointment, such as Aquaphor.

      Alternative lubricants that some parents find useful include Hydrolatum and Vanicream.

      Many experts recommend avoiding moisturizing lotions, as they often don't work as well as a cream or ointment.

      Steroid Creams
      These are the main treatments for atopic dermatitis when it flares up, and should be applied right after baths (and before a lubricant) and again during the day as directed. When the rash improves, cut back on how often you are using it and then stop until the rash flares up again.
      Common steroid creams include Cutivate, Westcort, Lociod Lipocream, Artistocort, and Elocon.

      Avoid using prescription steroid creams on the face or in the diaper area, unless specifically instructed to do so. An over the counter 1% Hydrocortisone cream is safer in these areas.

      For severe cases of eczema, a steroid ointment may be more effective than a cream.

      If your child's eczema improves when he is on a steroid and then quickly flares up again when you stop, it may help to use a 'step down' strategy where you taper the use of the steroid and use it less often, for example every other day and then 2-3 times a week, before finally stopping it. Or use a less potent steroid, like over the counter hydrocortizone after using a prescription strength steroid like Cutivate or Elocon.

      You might also ask your doctor about one of the newer non-steroidal medications, like Protopic or Elidel.

      Bathing and Eczema
      Bathing and eczema is a controversial topic, but many people think the practice of limiting baths is old school or old fashioned. Many experts now recommend a daily bath for kids with eczema.
      A daily bath for at least 15-20 minutes helps to moisturize the skin and make it less itchy. Be sure to use a mild, nondrying soap, such as Dove, Neutrogena, Tone, Caress, Dial, Basis, or Purpose, avoid vigorous scrubbing, use a soft towel to pat the skin dry and immediately (within 3 minutes) apply a lubricating cream afterwards.

      If your child's skin is not tolerating a daily bath, limit baths to every other day or try using a soap substitute, such as Cetaphil. Avoid using bubble baths, harsh or drying soaps and keep shampoo off the affected areas.

      Itching Relief
      Atopic dermatitis is a very itchy rash, and scratching usually makes it worse, so it is important to help control itching. You can use an oral antihistamine, such as Benadryl, especially at night to help control irritability and restlessness that the itching may cause. Always apply your steroid cream to areas that itch.
      Wet or damp dressings can sometimes help with severe itching. A wet-to-wet dressing can be made by having your child wear wetted pajamas after he takes a bath and then apply a dry layer over this.

      Also, keep your child's fingernails cut short to limit the damage caused by scratching.

      Eczema Prevention
      Help prevent flare-ups by avoiding things that are known to trigger your child's eczema. These may include certain foods (cow's milk, eggs, peanut butter, fish), wool fibers and clothes, rough or tight fitting clothing, dry air, sweating, getting too hot or too cold (avoid hot or cold water), harsh soaps or chemicals, and stress.
      Swimming is allowed, but immediately shower or bathe to wash off chlorine and other chemicals and apply a moisturizer to help prevent your child's skin from drying out.

      Important Reminders
      Be patient. This is a chronic disease that usually improves and then flares-up again, but one which is usually easily managed with the above therapies.
      Call your pediatrician if your child is not improving in 1-2 weeks with his current treatments, the itching is keeping your child awake at night, the rash is infected with pus or honey colored scabs, or if the rash becomes raw and bleeding.

      A secondary skin infection can often be to blame for eczema that isn't clearing up. A trial of an antibiotic or a bacterial skin culture might help to see if this is complicating your child's eczema.
      You sometimes have to experiment to find what works best for your child's eczema.
      Consider seeing an expert, such as a Pediatric Dermatologist if you and your Pediatrician are not able to get your child's eczema under good control.

  43. QUESTION:
    Does having mold give you dermatitis?
    I have had a rash for a while and after many medications it seems to be fading away since i started taking protopic. I had this rash about the same time i moved in this apt. My sister who lives with me seems to have the starting symptoms of my rash (rough irritating skin, inflamation) So does mold cause rashes, its not severe mold but its making clothes near the wall to smell.

    And also what are some good over the counter hydrocortisone or steroid lotions?

    • ANSWER:
      Rash is a bit vague. Red? White? Itchy? tiny blisters? hands and/or feet?
      Google Dyshidrosis. Images and dermnet.nz.
      Yes, allergy to the mold is causing the rash. However, the mold is not causing the rash where it touches you. The rash is a red flag that the mold is colonizing your skin.
      (Seriously, I would move to somewhere warm and dry.)
      Do not use steroids! This thins the skin, lowers the immunity. Protopic is no cure. It is dangerous overkill. The way to stop the itch is with anti-histamines. Take 90mg Fexofenadine twice a day, 12 hours apart. This is over the counter in Australia, I don't know for you.
      The drug you need is called Toctino for a cure. Go to dyshidrosis @ yahoogroups.com for other treatments. The naturopathic treatment is effective, a lot cheaper and a bit more complicated.

  44. QUESTION:
    Calling all eczema victims!?
    If you could answer any one of my questions, I'd be forever grateful! I have vaginal eczema in particular and I am trying EVERYTHING I can to make it go away!

    1. Has anyone tried using Protopic?
    My first try left me with severe burning and itching for over 2 hours. Is this normal? Did it work for you in the long run? Any other experiences with Protopic are helpful. And any knowledge you have about it.

    2. Has anyone tried POLYSPORIN?
    It sounds weird, seeing as it's antibiotic, but where my biopsy was done I had eczema (obviously) and now it is totally gone in that area! The only thing I did different to that area was put polysporin on it. Do you think it's worth a shot putting it everywhere else? I only put it on for 12 days then my stitches were removed and I didn't have to anymore. I can't believe this area is eczema free now. It was rapidly spreading around there and then POOF!

    3. What other things have you tried? Is lemon/bleach a bad thing to try on such a sensitive area? I've heard it works miracles...
    I have heard vitamin E, but my mom's eczema on her ankles reacted horribly to it, so I'm scared to try it. I am also taking 1200 mg of fish oil daily, One-A-Day Woman's Vitamins, I'm cooking with coconut oil, I'm prescribed to Allegra for 1 month (I don't really understand what it does - anyone know?). As far as topical things, I'm using Aveeno all natural lotion 2-3 times daily (try this if you can't find a good lotion, it's treating me well), hydro cortisone cream occasionally, and the steroidal Beta-Val cream when I'm desperate only.

    4. Has anyone's eczema moved to another area? (not spread, but literally moved - packed up and went somewhere else)
    This is what I'm desperately and consciously irrationally hoping for. My mom's moved from her wrists to her feet to her ankles where it now resides. This was over a 30-40 year span though.

    5. If you'd like, share your story.
    It's nice to know I'm not alone, statistics say 10% of the world's population has eczema, but I still feel all alone.

    & THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR HELP. Unlike most people, my eczema developed at 16. I'm now 18, and I was misdiagnosed by 3 doctors up until the fourth diagnosed me correctly about a month ago. So I'm still an eczema newbie and all your help is appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I've had eczema since I was around 2 days old. At first it was just the more obvious cracks, like the back of my legs on the knees, on the front of my elbows, and on the wrists. The ones on the wrists went away when I was 6 or 7. I used to use Vaseline and Eucerin, and I hated it because they're so sticky. My doctor recommended those steroids, and I think they ruined me even more. I don't trust the family doctors anymore. Then when I hit puberty, my face started to flare up a little, and I got bloody spots on my neck. I went to an acupuncture (Dr. Kei in San Mateo, but I don't know the address), and it got A LOT better. It didn't work after a few months though. And my whole neck has mild eczema, and it's itchy at night. Also, my wrists started to flare up again because one day I was stupid and wore two hairbands that were TOO TIGHT on my wrists. So I started exercising more, and it's great because the sweat will wash off all the bad stuff. But sweat also makes me itchy, so I need to hurriedly wash my arms before my plan backfires.

      My dance teacher told me that she had eczema when she was little, all the way until last year (She's 28 now) when she found a product called Cerave. She doesn't even look like she had eczema at all. Cerave seems to work well, but doesn't completely cure it. Her eczema was a lot worse though, and she sometimes had to go to the emergency room because of the horrible flare ups that made her bleed. And she said she had it everywhere, literally. So Cerave is worth a try :)


protopic makes me itch

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